Social Media: China to the United States

While our former president is teaching us how to take the best selfie, the Chinese government struggles to maintain control on the itching desire for social media freedom.

It seems we have found the two extremes when it comes to the affect social media is having on cultural experiences. However, I pause to ask myself, which seems better? To have so much information and accessibility we create a world of blurred lines between what news is real and fake, or to be cut off from any news sites completely – except those the government wishes to release? Both situations seem to have a doomed end result.

Today our social media is plagued with incredibly fake (can we even use this word still?) news sources. Let’s just name a few from one of my oh-so-fellow Facebook friends: The Daily Wire, where we learn there is proof that Obama spied on Trump, msfanpage.link where, again, there is undeniable proof of Obama’s wire tapping, Rowdy Republican, AM1280 The Patriot, 100percent Fed Up, jewsnews.com, and, my personal favorite, lowederwithcrowder.com.

Let’s get it together guys.

We forget that we have such an  amazing advantage with social media. We have proven these advantages in revolutionary proportions, the most notable example being the Arab Spring, where we were reminded just how incredibly influential social media platforms can be.

Social media has given a voice to the people and has forced companies to rethink their ethical responsibilities. Recently United Airlines learned how viral a situation can become when employees handled a situation painfully wrong.

We, as the people, have more power than we even know and we choose to pollute our platforms with junk. Meanwhile, our fellow millennials in China are fighting for their right to their online voice. We have the ability to be incredibly resourceful and create new possibilities for ourselves and others around the world. We just need to remember to stay focused on the validity of our sources.

Tell me social media marketing is bullshit, Mendelson.

A post shared by Jess for School (@jessklimischnewmediacomm) on

 

Blog Post #2

#blogpost2 Blogging as connected writing

 

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s