blog 7

 

In blog 5, I mentioned about a public issue that I was passionate about, which is proper parenting and “gun control”. My targeted audience in this blog would definitely have to be parents, or anyone who is planning/becoming a parent. The goal of the post is to spread awareness that your influence as a parent, aunt, and uncle plays a crucial role in any child’s life. Because kids pick up things so fast, it is easy to influence them, even when you didn’t think or plan it. This sounds ridiculous but i’m only sharing it because, this is as real as it gets. A few weeks back, I was babysitting my 3 years old twin cousins, which I do quite often. My little sister was recording me do a wall twerk on snapchat and, without realizing that my young cousins were watching, they copied my exact position and attempt to do it too. Kind of random, but, it’s an example. What I’m saying is, you never know when they’re paying attention, therefore, just be aware of what you’re doing and saying when around any child. Also, be aware of how you’re treating them. A lot of the reasons why kids become bullies is because of the lack of love and attention. Yes, we live in a world where if only one parent works, it’ll make it hard to make a living, let alone feed your kids. But it doesn’t mean you should let “working” be an excuse to why you can’t spend time with your child. The first stages of a child’s life is the most important, it is the foundation of who they will become. Don’t miss out on it, let alone, don’t let it go to waste. This could fall in 1.8: Behavioral Economics Theories. Where an environment can be affected to facilitate desirable behaviors. Attached is a link that showcases a study that claims second-born children are more likely to be trouble makers. THIS! I can vouch for. Not just the second child, I think that this can affect any child that is not the first or last. I am the fourth in my family, and I can guarantee you that all of us, after my older sister (first child) and my younger sister (last child) are trouble makers. I’m not sure why my other sibling are trouble makers, i’m not sure of their personal reasonings. But, in my case, all I can remember was wanting my parent’s love and attention. Like most parents now, my parents were immigrants, therefore, they had to work twice as hard. Especially since they had 6 extra mouths to feed, leaving my older to babysit us. My parents were always giving my older sister attention because she was the first to experience everything. Making her the more ambitious one like the article mentioned, “People like to say that first-born children are more motivated and more ambitious than their younger siblings, who, in turn, might end up more easygoing — possibly as a result of their mom and dad having loosened up on the parenting a bit after being super hands-on with their first kid” (Stuart, para. 2.) My parents were learning to be parents in America too, you may think, “parents in America?” but, parenting in America is far different from parenting from where my parents came from. My dad worked two jobs, my mom worked third shift. They never had time for us, not by choice, of course. But because I never got attention and “love” from them, I sought out acceptance from other people, such as my friends. One of my brother temporarily joined a gang, it was crazy. On the bright side, things eventually got better. We matured and figured out why our parents were never home, making us all appreciate them more. Not that I enjoyed growing up being extremely needy, but I like who I’ve become. And because life was such a struggle growing up, I never take my parents for granted. The environment you raise your child in plays a crucial role in their life. Like the theory model, I mentioned, behavioral economics, it talks more about the economics factors such as laws, regulations, and such, which I could correlate to my family’s situation too. Because, of the “parenting in America” I mentioned prior, it affected how my parents raised us, versus how they would’ve raised us if we were back in their homeland. But because they felt the need to have jobs in order to pay for utilities, rent, etc, it limited their time with us. Causing a domino affect on how we all grew up. My parents were young when they immigrated to the U.S. They were at most, in their early-mid twenties? They, themselves were growing up too. In Laos, you didn’t need “jobs.” You just needed land to grow your own food. According to my dad, you fed your own family. You went to the farm together, you ate together, you spent time together. In America, kids go to school (thankfully,) while parents work. In most immigrant cases, parents had to work harder for a longer time, all just for a small wage. So, I guess my audience would also be the government/congress, haha. Make it a law where all jobs are required to allow parents for a longer paid maternity leave to spend time with their kids. No child should lack their parent’s attention and love because of having to work just to keep a roof over their families heads, or meals on the table.

https://omgfacts.com/a-new-study-claims-second-born-children-are-more-likely-to-be-troublemakers/

1 thought on “blog 7

  1. I think that you addressed some really great points in this blog. It’s always important to be sensitive to the adolescents around you because you will never know what they will absorb and remember or what they will brush off and forget about. Also that’s a huge sacrifice that your parents made for you and your siblings.

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