All posts by poeticsinglemama (Jennifer)

Glorifying Obesity?

fat girls.PNGHave you ever seen a social media campaign that you agree with to some extent but that also makes you queasy a bit at the same time? This is where I am at with some body-positivity campaigns. I grew up skinny, I was somewhat skinny even after I had two kids in my early 20’s, but now I am not. I am the heaviest I have ever weighed in my entire life weighing in at just over 200 pounds (did I really just type that?!). I weigh more now than I did when I was 9-months pregnant with my eldest daughter. I feel uncomfortable in my own skin, I do not like looking at the woman I see in the mirror, I am grossed out by how fat she’s allowed herself to become. So, believe me, I get what it feels like to have had it ingrained in you your entire life since birth that a certain shape, weight, or size is the standard of beauty and I am happy to see some of those standards shattered. It makes me smile when I go to Target and see the models without their stretch marks photoshopped away or when I hear my 16-year-old daughter say she likes her stretchmarks. At the same time, I also know that I get out of breath when I have to climb stairs while hiking to a waterfall, its uncomfortable to bend over for too long, I feel the health effects of carrying around 35 – 50 extra pounds of weight. Continue reading Glorifying Obesity?

We Should ALL be Feminists

Feminism: the advocacy of women’s rights on the basis of the equality of the sexes.

This seems like a simple enough concept yet in many circles the word feminism has become a dirty word. I have read articles that use it as a derogatory term, that have claimed feminism has been the downfall of western civilization, and that have accused feminists of hating men. I have read women claim to not be feminists because they want to stay home with their children, as if feminism means all women have to work and put their kids in daycare. That isn’t what it means. It very simply means that they should have the choice to stay at home or to enter the workforce and that if they do enter the workforce, they should have equality in pay and opportunities for promotion. Inequalities in the United States are not as pervasive as they are in some parts of the world, but they still persist. Below shows the pay gap by state as of 2016.

gender pay gap

Continue reading We Should ALL be Feminists

TED TALKS – SOCIAL MEDIA TO INSPIRE

If you are in the professional world you’ve likely been invited to, attended, participated in, or at the very least heard of a conference related to your industry. I work in education and our high-level district staff and board members attend a conference every year that gathers people together from large, urban districts around the country to share ideas and best practices. Conferences are great opportunities to network but are often out of reach for small businesses, non-profits, or individuals due to the cost of attendance.

Continue reading TED TALKS – SOCIAL MEDIA TO INSPIRE

Kids Care…Do You?

My 16-year old daughter texted me this morning letting me know she was likely participating in a walk-out from school. This did not surprise me, she’s walked out to join protests before in support of Black Lives Matter and/or in protest of police brutality. She has taken part in a push for her former middle school to change its name (which it did!) and protested a dress code that she viewed as sexist, leading to discussions with school administration on a more equitable dress code. This time when I asked her what for she simply said, “the environment.” I then heard rumblings at work that students from one of our other high schools were all leaving after 2nd period and heading to the capitol building to participate in the International Youth Climate Strike event. So, I googled exactly what that was.

How did I not hear about this prior to this morning? Has my head been in the clouds? Have I been too distracted by work, school, and my flooded basement? How has this world-wide strike been coordinated and the first I hear of it is when my teenager texts me that she is joining it? Granted, I do not use Snapchat or whatever other apps the younger generation are using. I am “old,” so I use Facebook. The Guardian is giving live updates showing strikes, marches, and protests from around the world. There is a float of 16-year-old Nobel peace prize nominee Greta Thunberg in Sweden. There are kids in school uniforms protesting outside of parliament in Cape Town, South Africa. The protests in London took local police by surprise as they headed towards Buckingham Palace and chanted “we want change” in front of the Queen’s residence.  You can read the live updates here.

This movement, the way that the strikes were organized, and their central push to create “system change, not climate change” is tied in so well to what Manuel Castells speaks about in his book “Networks of Outrage and Hope.” In this article by Sophie Sleeman she talks about how this social movement is forming via social media and how social movements like this are “redefining political space and challenging the idea that social media platforms are only uncontrollable forces beyond our control.” Instead, she declares, they are being used to change the world.

Students in Ukraine hold signs that say, “Make My Planet Great Again” and “Don’t Burn Our Future.” In Poland, a large polluter, they hold signs that say, “Without plastic it’s fantastic.” In London they went heavy on the signage with some of them questioning why they are being forced to study for a future they will not even have if climate change continues at the rate it currently is.

London school climate strikes

What is it going to take to get the adults in positions of leadership to act with the urgency our youth is demanding? We cannot take small, incremental steps towards change or continue to act like it is something that can wait for the next decade, the next administration, or the next legislative session to tackle. Scientists around the world agree that we are either at or near a point of no return related to climate change. Some argue that we can no longer stop a 2-degree increase in global warming, and instead argue we need to do everything in our power to mitigate going beyond that. Others are still hoping we can stop it at 1.5 degrees although now that the U.S. has pulled out of the Paris Climate Agreement, as one of the largest consumers in the world, I am not sure how likely that is.

Our youth, our kids, our grand-kids will be the ones who will see and live through the effects of the decisions that we are making right now. Aside from taking on these tips for reducing our own carbon footprint, we need to consider a person’s views on environmental policy when deciding who to vote for, put pressure on elected officials already in office, and vote those out who are not voting in the best interest of this earth’s future. Saving this planet must start with us, our kids are begging us – will we listen?

 

Should We All Be Scientists?

Last semester in my Information Studies class I was tasked with doing a research paper on something related to information and the way it is changing in the digital age. We had just finished a unit on Wikipedia and so I was curious if there were other platforms like that where ordinary people contribute to something that used to be entirely the purview of experts. I started digging around, googling things I was interested in, and I stumbled upon citizen science. Although I have not yet participated in a project, I have since been in awe of the possibilities this presents.

Before I go too far down the rabbit hole, let me briefly explain what citizen science is. citizen science involves utilizing ordinary citizens in the collection of, and sometimes the analysis of, data for scientific purposes. I will not regurgitate my research paper beyond that, but the potential this creates is vast and then you throw in social media and the potential explodes. Continue reading Should We All Be Scientists?