All posts by stateofmindee

About stateofmindee

Mindy is a social media enthusiast attending Metro State for her B.A. in Public Relations and a minor in Digital Media. Currently, she's a Social Associate at Lola Red PR (Minneapolis). In her free time, you can find her fully immersed in online publications that focus on the #everydaygirl, sustainable fashion and conscious living.

Influencer Woos

Link: https://www.abbienaija.com/2018/12/being-influencer-is-not-real-job.html

The point of working is to make money and be successful as long as it is legitimate. Right?

Abimbola is a Social Media Influencer and Fashion Blogger. She states that being an ‘Influencer’ is a real job that comes with tasks, deadlines, campaign direction(s), pivots, research and overall hard work. Just like any job, there’s competition and the need to stand out and be among the top influencers a brand or company chooses to work with (whether for a one-off project or an ongoing campaign). She hints that being an Influencer might even be a little risky because of the inconsistency in payments – “Oh, did I mention how you have to wait 30 days or even two months before you get paid?

She does state that there are influencers out there who are fake and only care about the money; who don’t actually trust or believe in the product(s) they’re recommending/promoting to their audience base.

Overall, am I impressed?
Yes, actually. From someone who’s been interning at a PR agency for the last 11 months, I’d say Abimbola is very knowledgeable (I’m sure) in what a partnership looks like for her and what it could look like for the brand/agency she’s working with. And it looks like she’s already made headway in paid sponsored content (see screen grabs above) and living her best “Instagram” life.

Is there more to uncover, beyond her blog?
Oh yeah. I’m sure she meant every word on her post – but I do feel like she’s approaching it from an “I’m a starving artist” standpoint. In addition, YES – from an agency POV, an entire marketing/PR campaign works when you are pitching the media, running social, managing paid ads, etc. however, what they don’t tell you is that these campaigns have been in the planning stages for months maybe even years. In these cases, how effective and necessary are influencers? And most importantly, brands want to know how reliable these Influencers are.

There are a lot of gray areas when agreeing to these kinds of partnerships. More often than not, brands know what they want and can give more content direction, but sometimes it could flop if you let an influencer get too creative. For example, Tiffany Mitchell (@tifforelie), an Influencer with over 200k+ followers on Insta posted a photo of her mid-accident after crashing her motorcycle. In her lengthy post about the accident, there’s an image that clearly shows a bottle of Smartwater. Because her post came off as staged, she received a ton of backlash. (Yikes)

Brands shouldn’t have to rely on Influencers.
I believe that if a brand’s story, mission or vision is top of mind for everyone at their company (meaning all employees practice and demonstrates the company’s core values) then there would be no need for Influencers whatsoever – I strongly believe that the greatest assets a company or brand has are its people: the employees, their families, their corporate responsibility partnerships, etc. A brand should want to rely on these folks to be their number one advocator and not someone they randomly found through an Insta hashtag.

M

Success.

Do you ever have moments where you sit and think… you could’ve and should’ve graduated already, have married someone by now, bought a home and started a family? That was me.

I remember days where I’d be scrolling through my Facebook or Instagram feed, and I’d feel this pang of envy (aka FOMO) every time I saw a friend or family member’s big announcement. I’d always think to myself, “I should’ve been engaged by now too, right?” or “shouldn’t I have already moved out two years ago?” Of course these aren’t exactly positive thoughts but as a 20-something year old, they came and went rather frequently (especially at family gatherings or events).

This idea of what success is and isn’t is and was no stranger to me. I am the oldest daughter, the oldest grandchild, the “second” mom to everyone younger than me – so it wasn’t hard to comprehend what others wanted for me. Of course, their intentions were good – “I just want the best for you.” “I want you to be successful, that’s all.” And I get that. But, no one should feel like they are bound to someone else’s definition of success.

Forbes published an article in 2016, titled “My Biggest Regret in Life: Going to College.” It highlighted the author’s POV on why you just might regret continuing higher-ed. Many, in fact, do believe that, “College isn’t a shortcut to success. In fact, it may be a roadblock to your success.” And respectively, I understand that too. Everyone’s experiences are different. Someone could’ve had a crappy experience during their first semester while another believes that it’s just a waste of time. In the last few years, the perception behind not going to college is changing – and many are searching for creative ways to obtain real-world experiences without having to spend huge weeps of money for a piece of paper or to “read a book.”

In contrast, Abound: Finish College, a college guidance system for degree-seeking adults, wrote a blog post breaking down the advantages of earning your degree: 1) a changing job market 2) an ill-prepared labor force 3) the impact of a college degree for your family, friends, children and community.

In fact, experts expect that by the year 2020, two out of every three jobs will require a bachelor’s degree.

These are all valid reasons and perspectives – but again, it’s what works for other people. It’s how others define success but it’s not how you define it. So hopefully during this pandemic, you’re able to slow down and truly think about how others have influenced or pressured you into thinking the way they do, how your experiences contribute to who you are today, and what true success looks like [for you] in the next 3-5 years. Maybe even 10 years.

Cheers,

M

I’m a Fraud.

Okay, I’m not. But I do often ask myself the following questions: Am I really good at what I do? Do I actually have solid experience to be giving you a reco (aka recommendation) and my POV? Am I just lucky? Do I deserve to be here?

Some days, I’m a natural hustler – I can tackle my day-to-day tasks and leave feeling very accomplished. Other days, I get too hard on myself if I mess up or don’t get something right. I crawl into a tiny ball inside my head and feel unnecessarily small, telling myself I’m not fit to be doing the work that I do.

There’s a word for that. It’s called the Imposter Syndrome. And here’s how I’ve learned to beat it on the not-so-good days.

Graphic created via Canva

So if you’ve managed to skip over the definition of Imposter Syndrome, in brief, it can be described as “…a feeling of phoniness and unworthiness among people when it comes to their achievements. And even though they’re highly motivated, they don’t really believe any of the credit that comes their way.” (Lou Solomon, TEDx)

“We feel like we have snuck in the back door of life’s theater and made our way up on stage and there’s a big bouncer out there and we know that if he sees us, we’re outta here so we’re constantly looking over our shoulder.”

Lou Solomon, TEDx Charlotte: The Surprising Solution to the Imposter Syndrome

1. Use social for self-good.

Affirmations are really energy boosters. Sometimes when I’m in a rut and I can’t seem to get out of my thoughts, I need emotional support. And it’s completely okay to need it and want it. This usually comes in the form of a social media post on Facebook where I ask friends and family to send me words of encouragement; this can either be in the comment section or a personal message. It’s not because I’m self-absorbed or needy (fortunately, I’ve overcome this thought), it’s because I’ve gathered the courage to ask of and for others so that I can continue showing up and being the best version I can be.

“The things you can do to sustain strength in your life is to live, fail, love and ask for help.” 

Lou Solomon, TEDx Charlotte: The Surprising Solution to the Imposter Syndrome

2. Go out and see people.

Usually on my bad days, all I want to do is shut the blinds, hop into bed and watch Korean dramas – consciously forgetting that I have a million other to-dos. I do this because it’s easier. I’m still working on keeping myself accountable, but as described, I can’t some days. So I make sure I get others to keep me accountable; this usually means setting up dates with friends! Coffees, dinners, brunches, you name it. Getting up, dressing up and eating out seems to do the trick. It’s refreshing to talk about other topics of interest and catch up with people I love. It’s real medicine and I forget that my mind and soul needs it from time to time. And maybe yours does too.

3. Create.

There’s something so peaceful about letting your creativity just flow. No pre-conceived notions, no creative briefs, no goals or strategies. I’ve just recently started this creative journey with 100 Days of Drawing – instead of strictly going a hundred days, I’ve taken it slow, skipped a few pages and drawn whatever I felt like drawing. That’s the beauty of creating; there are no expectations and no limits. Drawing, manifesting, creating – it all leads to self-discovery. However, I’m not a regular doodler and I don’t draw on the daily (as mentioned). I save drawing for when I most need it. When the days are exhausting, my thoughts too heavy and my social a little too saturated, it’s only then that I draw. It’s the “me now” investing in much-needed space and time for the “future me.”

4. Find your radical hero.

With every villain, there’s a radical hero. In her TED talk, Lou describes this radical hero being wiser and not willing to buy into your negative thoughts; someone who has a deeper point of view and is essentially your own personal cheerleader. When you start to doubt yourself and your self worth, summon your radical hero to call out the lies and the limiting beliefs that could isolate you and allow yourself to listen for brilliance. Once you’re able to, you’ll start to see some clarity and feel a lot better knowing that you’re more than qualified. You’re right where you’re supposed to be.

5. Reflect.

I’m no where near where I want to be in terms of mental and emotional wealth, but I’m getting there. Slowly but surely. And it all comes down to reflecting. Reflecting on my way to work, through a podcast, right before bed or even as I’m brushing my teeth. I’m a busy person and I get bursts of reflective moments. It’s odd but it works for me and my lifestyle. So here’s my last request of you in conquering this epidemic, always pursue a sense of wholeness over perfection. Taking time to reflect on your highs and lows, the work you want to do and your purpose in life will allow you to see things in a different light and set you up for success. And even that might look a little different and that’s okay.

Cheers,

M

Intrigued? Learn more about Imposter Syndrome HERE.