Category Archives: Social Media

Social Media & Consumerism! – Blog Post #5

How many purchases have you made because it was trendy on social media? Social media has created a pathway for influencers, celebrities, and brands to advertise their products on each platform… what does this lead to? Consumerism! I cannot tell you the number of times I fell into the “TikTok hype” before I do, let me define what “TikTok hype” means. It’s a phrase that’s commonly used today by many users, to describe something that is worth buying. Influencers will post about a sponsorship, or a regular person will just record a product review of the item and tell people to buy it, etc. I’ve wasted so much money because I always used to buy the trendiest thing, whether it was hair accessories, clothing, beauty products, or anything else. It’s crazy how social media has such an influence on how I spend my money.  In the “How does Social Media Influence Consumer Behavior” article by Clootrack, there’s this interesting quote that stood out to me… the text states “A Deloitte report highlighted that consumers who are influenced by social media are 4 times more likely to spend more on purchases”. 

When people are sharing their experience/review of a product, it will influence others to try it out. It’s become so crazy that people now have their own “Amazon Storefront”. This is where they list all the products they buy, so others can buy them off their page. If a purchase is made, the individual will receive a percentage. It has literally become a business… a shady one too if I might add. How do we know what’s real anymore or what’s worth buying? How do I know if they just want to make a $$$ off me? 

The “How Social Media influences Us to Buy” article by becomingminimalist addresses an interesting point. The article states that “social media advertising is more effective because the opportunity to purchase is immediate”– What this means is that if we see an ad for new shoes, we are going to buy it within that same minute because of how convenient our phone is to online shopping. Whereas before people would see an ad, and drive to the store, all while remembering what it is they want. But since we have our phones, all we need is the app and to have our credit card info memorized…that’s all it takes. I like how this article specifically addresses how personal spending is more visible. For instance, if I see my friend spending money, I will also think I should/can spend money too. Everyone has their reasons, but maybe it’s because they’re influenced by that one purchase their friend made, and now it’s “Oh I think I want this too”. This is why I prefer to do my shopping alone because I don’t want to buy unnecessary things, and feel pressured/influenced. I am trying to become a minimalist every day, I only buy staple pieces for my wardrobe, and I no longer feel the need to buy into trends. 

The two articles: 

Why The (2017) “The Mummy” Is A Shell of An Adventure

#BLOG 3

INTRO

The review produced by Screenrant tries hard to give “The Mummy” movie a bone but ends up killing it even faster. The honest truth of the matter, “The Mummy” tries to be something it’s not and doesn’t even do that well. Giving the audience five reasons why the movie was bad and why it was good.

  1. A Disappointingly Small Scale:

Oddly enough for a movie called The Mummy, the story spends very little time in Egypt, or anywhere comparable, and, instead, sets the majority of its action sequences somewhere around Surrey, England. Which doesn’t really spell rip-roaring adventure to most people.

Even when the movie reaches the streets of London for its third act, the sets and locations feel quite limited, and the color palette is remarkably grey and monotonous.

Response: The movie shouldn’t have been set in England in the first place. At least with the last Mummy movie with Branden Frasier, it was based in China with a Chinese mummy. It makes total sense and at no point are you confused. Was the Dragon Emperor a good film like its predecessors? Sort of, but not quite.However, The Dragon Emperor has many redeeming qualities that make it a worthwhile watch.

  1. Isn’t: Tom Cruise Has Still Got It

There are few movie actors left in the business who have the star power of Tom Cruise and, at age 54, he still brought some much-needed charm to The Mummy.

Not only could Cruise sell moments of tension and action, but his all-around enthusiasm for the process energizes the wearier aspects of the movie in a way that few actors possibly could have.

Response: I’ll be honest, I don’t really know much about Tom Cruise, and that’s OK. Although I did like him in “Interview with a Vampire”. He was very mysterious in his villainy. Although in this movie, he’s just not the guy for the role or anybody for that matter.

  1. Generic Screenwriting

Despite some very talented screenwriters working on the project, The Mummy fails to stand out from the blockbuster crowd and this is mostly its own fault.

The popular MacGuffin of a magic rock is introduced almost immediately in the movie and a predictable course of events feels secondary to the movie’s desire to flesh out a fictional universe that audiences will never actually get to see.

Response: The plot was flat; you don’t need to beat around the bush. This director completely misses the essence and fun of the other films. Branden Frasier, along with the rest of its cast, added too much flavor to the franchise just for it to taste bland.

  1. Stunts

Tom Cruise’s dedication to stuntwork on his own movies is well documented and The Mummy is no different. Having the lead actor actually get inside as many of the action shots as they can brings a lot to a movie and it helps this one feel like more of a romp.

Though a lack of originality holds it back, The Mummy is a movie that’s always trying to be entertaining in an almost slapstick kind of way and the physicality of the action adds a lot of personality to the comedy.

Response: “The Mummy” Franchise is not Mission Impossible, a James Bond movie, a spy movie, Jason Born, or Taken. It’s literally a fantasy adventure, and that’s all it ever was.

  1. Tasteless Updates to the Story

For a movie presenting so many distinct time periods and cultural icons, you’d think The Mummy would present at least one of them in a satisfying way.

Aside from sidelining Egypt, and needlessly adding medieval English history to the mix, the movie makes the particularly tasteless choice to set its opening action sequence in modern-day Iraq with a force that is, while stereotypically faceless and nameless, essentially ISIS.

Response: Making more vibrant environments would have helped the film.

  1. A Combined Monster Universe Isn’t a Bad Idea

While The Mummy often fails to frame it in an appealing way, the central idea of the movie isn’t a bad one. Universal alone had been doing monster team-ups and crossovers for just shy of three-quarters of a century before the movie came out.

The movie’s idea to unify everything through what would almost certainly be its Nick Fury figure, Dr. Jekyll/Mr. Hyde and a S.H.I.E.L.D.-like organization with its own potential to spin-off and become evil, there are some entertaining promises made. Even if they’re only just that.

Response: Creating a creature feature universe from other monster franchises wasn’t a terrible concept. What was a terrible concept was using “The Mummy” as its basis to debut. The titles below are all the movies that would have been in theaters if Warner Bros. hadn’t ditched the project. I think Dr. Jeckyll and Mr. Hyde could have been a smash hit!

  • The Dark Universe Begins – and Ends. Universal Pictures. …
  • Van Helsing. Universal Pictures. …
  • Johnny Depp’s Invisible Man. Universal Pictures. …
  • Phantom of the Opera and Hunchback. Universal Pictures. …
  • Dwayne Johnson’s The Wolfman. …
  • Creature from the Black Lagoon. …
  • The Bride of Frankenstein.
  1. It Borrows Very Heavily from Much Better Things

Arguing over how original the story really is is something that you could do with every version of The Mummy, from the original in 1932 to everything that it’s inspired since. But the 2017 version chooses much more poorly with extra cultural references and they often end up contradicting the tone of the movie.

The Mummy wants to be a horror movie in an atmospheric kind of way rather than by showing anything overtly horrific or grotesque but it also wants to be an Indiana Jones movie, which, of course, balanced its joyful qualities with more graphic imagery. It’s overwhelming visual similarities to the Uncharted series of video games (which were, themselves, already heavily inspired by The Mummy movies) also feels like an aesthetically-confused choice.

Response: Sure….I suppose

  1. It Brings Horror To a Non-Horror Audience

Not everyone watches movies in the same way and people don’t always have the same access to movies. The Mummy goes for as wide an audience as it can because it wants to reach the most amount of people and make the most amount of money, yes, but it actually succeeds in bringing classical horror aspects to audiences who ordinarily wouldn’t get to see them.

Aside from Cruise’s name bringing his own kind of audience, The Mummy was a financial hit in China, a country famous for its stringent censorship laws surrounding, amongst several other things, the horror genre and the supernatural.

Response: If you want horror elements but not a horror movie, go watch Pan’s Labrinth.

  1. It Puts the Cart Before the Horse

So much of what makes people remember the 2017 version of The Mummy as a bad movie is that it set itself such an unnecessarily high bar for success.

Audiences were definitely holding it up to, at least, the first two Stephen Sommers Mummy movies but the gigantic budget and shared universe were both its own choice yet both feel wasted. They transform it into something that audiences actively root against rather than for.

Response: Were they trying to give this movie a chance? The response says it all regarding the film successs.

  1. A Pervading Sense of Humor

Stories of production troubles on The Mummy are easy to believe but, no matter how things really went down, what the cast and crew were able to pull out of the movie is a light tone and some comedic chemistry from its actors.

Cruise is a big star with a knack for making sure his movies are driven by him but not all about him. He creates entertaining dynamics with a wide variety of talented actors that he’s paired with and allows what’s best about them to really shine in the movie, even if it isn’t for every long.

Response: Tom Cruise added nothing to this movie, nor did the humor.

Conclusion

After tentatively rewatching the (2017) “The Mummy” I realized the movie is empty. The characters have no volume, the anti-protagonist is wildly underutilized, comedic conversations are out of place, and the tone of the movie is too dark (the color of the film). The movie is not fun, and it comes off more as a chore for the audience to get through. Ultimately, I was surprised at a few points throughout the movie and bored at the same time.

Is Social Media Healthy

Is Social Media Healthy?

This blog post contains information on the health components of the usage of social media. 

Many individuals who use social media are being reinforced into believing “likes” are a reward. When we feel as though we are liked enough by others, our brain releases dopamine, making us feel better about ourselves.

I am guilty, social media has definitely made me care more about the way I present myself. The beauty standards, especially for women are unattainable and fake. Social media has created filters, photo editing apps, beauty enhancement features. Many individuals, post in order to gain or get a response from others focusing to much of their energy on interactions. Many individuals focus on the feedback from their post and also compare their post to others.

FOMO

I was introduced to this new term called FOMO, which stands for Fear of Missing Out. Many fear not making memories and missing out on experiences. Missing experiences can often lead to anxiety and depression. Often, many individuals find out through social media that they were not invited to an event. Not being invited to an event that all your friends are at can cause overthinking, provoke thoughts and negative feelings. 

It is important to remember that this is a real thing and often can make us as humans feel bad about ourselves. I bet, we can all agree we’ve been left out of something and has affected us negatively. Social media has made it seem as though others have better lives than the ones we do and are having more fun than we are. It is important to remember that this phenomenon is becoming normalized due to the consumption of social media. There are helpful coping methods to deal with the fear of missing out. It is important that many focus on what they have rather than what they lack. Doing healthy things for example like journaling and finding   meaningful connections can help with the negative health affects of FOMO and the negative affect of social media. 

Social Media on Mental Health

Social media has many benefits if used positively. It allows many to share their ideas, connects individuals, and many get news and information from using social media.  If used negatively it can impact your health by creating depression, anxiety, and feeling lonely.

If you find yourself de-prioritizing your self over social media, noticing that relationships are being affected, noticing that you’re falling behind on priorities, and comparing yourself to others and getting jealous, social media has affect your mental health. 

When I realize that my mental health is off, I’ve find myself setting  limiting social media apps

to decrease my usage on social media. Social media has definitely affected my mental health. I have found myself worrying about things that don’t matter due to social media. I have often taken  social media breaks to focus on myself.  

“Social media has created a society that cares about “likes” rather than meaningful connections. Social media can be damaging towards our mental health. Some helpful tips include talking breaks from social media and finding meaningful connections”. 

IneyeMDST instagram

Social Media Bans For College Athletes

Some colleges tend to bring in a lot of revenue due to their great college sport teams, but that also means they have a reputation to uphold. Universities across the country are obtaining a good reputation by banning their athletes from using their social media not only during their sports season but the duration of the school year.

 “Well, we have some dumb, immature players that put crap on their Twitter, and we don’t need that. So the best thing to do is just ban it . . . .” Steve Spurrier, the head coach of the South Carolina Gamecocks football team said.

Some of the universities that participated in a similar ban include: The Mississippi State University men’s basketball team, the New Mexico State University men’s basketball team, The University of Georgia men’s basketball program, the University of South Carolina Gamecocks, the Boise State University Broncos, the University of Iowa Hawkeyes, and the University of Kansas Jayhawks.

So, are social media bans for athletes THAT bad? The way I see it, they are protecting these students and their potential careers in the world of sports or other career ventures. I do believe banning social media outside of their sports season is a bit much. However, if their dream is to play sports, restricting their social media can help their social media presence appeal to recruiters.  

Can Social Media Threaten Our First Amendment Rights?

Back in March of 2020, a high school student was threatened with jail time if she did not take down a social media post. Not only was she threatened with jail time so were her parents, over a post on Instagram. This post consisted of her in a hospital bed, explaining how she was sick with COVID. As a student, she thought it was her right to be able to use her social media accounts to express her frustrations, or to update everyone on how she was doing.

“The girl’s messages caused panic,” said an attorney for the Marquette County Sheriff’s Department. The panic eventually led to a Marquette County Sheriff Joseph Konrath and a patrol sergeant confronting the teenager about her post and demanding her to take it down.

However, the teenage girl recently just won the lawsuit against the sheriff and the patrol sergeant.

“Demanding a 16-year-old remove protected speech from her Instagram account is a First Amendment violation,” said the judge.

We live in a time where we must protect even our online presence. This teenage girl thought she was bringing awareness on how real this COVID pandemic is and was faced with a harsh reality. The right to free speech should always be protected when it comes to one’s social media presence.

The Parenting Power Struggle With Technology & Learning How To Manage It

Technology has given us way more than just a more connected world. 

People Are Losing Themselves Every Day To The Internet

On March 26, 2021, a young 28-year old woman left home without her car, keys, wallet, ID, or cell phone. She was found dead, presumably having jumped in front of an Amtrak train after battling with years of depression.

She had 82,000 followers on Instagram and traveled the world as an influencer, a career millions of teens dream of.

This kind of thing happens every day.

We just don’t hear about it because it doesn’t always happen to people who are in the spotlight.

This is a problem. 

Technology & Media Are All-Consuming

COVID-19 literally forced our kids to be dependent on their devices. From the moment they wake up in the morning and turn on the TV to enjoy some cartoons with their breakfast, to the minute they sign on to their Zoom meeting, and then when it’s time to take a break, they’re switching over to a game on their devices.  

It’s terrifying how dependent our children have become. 

We Don’t Know What To Do Without It

Without even realizing it, we as parents have become addicted to our devices. So much that when we lose or misplace them, we don’t know what to do with ourselves. 

I’ve heard it many times before. I don’t know what I’d do without my phone. And when we do, we feel out of touch—out of sorts. Like we’re missing everything that’s going on in the world.

It’s dangerous really, because we’re giving these inanimate objects complete control over how we function in our daily lives. And it’s only going to get worse. 

This is a learned behavior that we’re passing onto our children.  

The Power Struggle With Tech Needs To Stop

Don’t get me wrong, I love technology. But it’s starting to interfere with the way some people parent. And I’ll be the first person to admit it. 

I, too, used to hand my phone off to my daughter when she was throwing a temper tantrum because it was easier than actually addressing the reason behind the tantrum. Pure laziness, which is why the millennial generation is earning such a bad reputation. 

We need to start being more attentive.

We need to stop letting technology influence our children.

We need to address these issues head on. 

Our children are learning that instead of coping with their emotions, they can just tune in to something else and forget the problem altogether. But this is helpful for no one. 

Children desperately need to be able to feel, and we need to give them a chance to do so. We’re not helping anybody by letting these moments get swept under the rug.

It’s absolutely the reason we hear more and more parents complain about their kid’s behavior and increase in gaming addictions. But we can’t blame them because we’ve never taught our child how to use tech responsibly because we’re still learning how to do it on our own.

We Have To Find A Balance

It starts with us. The parents. I don’t ever want my daughter to think that anything on a device is more important than her, as I’m sure most parents would agree.

We need to teach our children when it’s OK to use technology and when it’s time to step back, and more importantly, recognizing when and why they need to do so.

Helpful Tips: 

  1. Have a conversation with your family about technology and the role that it plays in their lives. This is a great time to explain the pros and cons, and to let everyone voice their opinion. There is no right or wrong, the point is to get everything out in the open before laying down the ground rules. 
  1. Set specific times that children can be online. Before dinner is a great place to start because it gives you the quiet time you need to get everything on the table, and it usually doesn’t take more than an hour or so, which is plenty of time for kids to be watching TV or using the Internet. Use the time after dinner to do something together as a family that DOES NOT involve technology. Play a game, read a book, do a craft, take a walk… the possibilities are endless. 
  1. Be consistent. I need to start taking my own advice on this one, but it’s pretty much the icing on top of the cake. Once you’ve put your plan in place you must stick to it. Kids need to know that what you say is going to happen is actually going to happen, or else they start to take advantage of it. And that my friend, is a much larger problem with a much longer road to recovery that you DO NOT want to embark on.  

Kids will remember the effort whether they like it now or not. In the end, it will help them become a much more enjoyable human being to be around, and they’ll thank you someday. 

Kids Care…Do You?

My 16-year old daughter texted me this morning letting me know she was likely participating in a walk-out from school. This did not surprise me, she’s walked out to join protests before in support of Black Lives Matter and/or in protest of police brutality. She has taken part in a push for her former middle school to change its name (which it did!) and protested a dress code that she viewed as sexist, leading to discussions with school administration on a more equitable dress code. This time when I asked her what for she simply said, “the environment.” I then heard rumblings at work that students from one of our other high schools were all leaving after 2nd period and heading to the capitol building to participate in the International Youth Climate Strike event. So, I googled exactly what that was.

How did I not hear about this prior to this morning? Has my head been in the clouds? Have I been too distracted by work, school, and my flooded basement? How has this world-wide strike been coordinated and the first I hear of it is when my teenager texts me that she is joining it? Granted, I do not use Snapchat or whatever other apps the younger generation are using. I am “old,” so I use Facebook. The Guardian is giving live updates showing strikes, marches, and protests from around the world. There is a float of 16-year-old Nobel peace prize nominee Greta Thunberg in Sweden. There are kids in school uniforms protesting outside of parliament in Cape Town, South Africa. The protests in London took local police by surprise as they headed towards Buckingham Palace and chanted “we want change” in front of the Queen’s residence.  You can read the live updates here.

This movement, the way that the strikes were organized, and their central push to create “system change, not climate change” is tied in so well to what Manuel Castells speaks about in his book “Networks of Outrage and Hope.” In this article by Sophie Sleeman she talks about how this social movement is forming via social media and how social movements like this are “redefining political space and challenging the idea that social media platforms are only uncontrollable forces beyond our control.” Instead, she declares, they are being used to change the world.

Students in Ukraine hold signs that say, “Make My Planet Great Again” and “Don’t Burn Our Future.” In Poland, a large polluter, they hold signs that say, “Without plastic it’s fantastic.” In London they went heavy on the signage with some of them questioning why they are being forced to study for a future they will not even have if climate change continues at the rate it currently is.

London school climate strikes

What is it going to take to get the adults in positions of leadership to act with the urgency our youth is demanding? We cannot take small, incremental steps towards change or continue to act like it is something that can wait for the next decade, the next administration, or the next legislative session to tackle. Scientists around the world agree that we are either at or near a point of no return related to climate change. Some argue that we can no longer stop a 2-degree increase in global warming, and instead argue we need to do everything in our power to mitigate going beyond that. Others are still hoping we can stop it at 1.5 degrees although now that the U.S. has pulled out of the Paris Climate Agreement, as one of the largest consumers in the world, I am not sure how likely that is.

Our youth, our kids, our grand-kids will be the ones who will see and live through the effects of the decisions that we are making right now. Aside from taking on these tips for reducing our own carbon footprint, we need to consider a person’s views on environmental policy when deciding who to vote for, put pressure on elected officials already in office, and vote those out who are not voting in the best interest of this earth’s future. Saving this planet must start with us, our kids are begging us – will we listen?

 

Should We All Be Scientists?

Last semester in my Information Studies class I was tasked with doing a research paper on something related to information and the way it is changing in the digital age. We had just finished a unit on Wikipedia and so I was curious if there were other platforms like that where ordinary people contribute to something that used to be entirely the purview of experts. I started digging around, googling things I was interested in, and I stumbled upon citizen science. Although I have not yet participated in a project, I have since been in awe of the possibilities this presents.

Before I go too far down the rabbit hole, let me briefly explain what citizen science is. citizen science involves utilizing ordinary citizens in the collection of, and sometimes the analysis of, data for scientific purposes. I will not regurgitate my research paper beyond that, but the potential this creates is vast and then you throw in social media and the potential explodes. Continue reading Should We All Be Scientists?

Teens & Social Media: Is it a Good Thing?

Social media refers to websites and applications that enable users to create and share content quickly, efficiently and in real-time.

As we continue to evolve with new technologies, our teens are influencing the popularity of social media platforms such as with Snapchat, YouTube, and Instagram.

Most teens believe social media has had mostly positive effects on them.  They feel that it helps them connect more with family members, interact with people their own age, and make new friends.

Social media has gotten a bad reputation in recent years, but there are many positive effects of social media on teenagers.

Users are able to quickly share opinions about people, places or things; buy/sell/review products and services; upload photographs; post events, find jobs, meet new friends and much more!  The use of social media allows teens to:

  • Quickly communicate & collaborate with others
  • Be entertained
  • Learn how to do just about anything, including play a guitar, cooking or anything else you can think of
  • Meet new friends
  • Find the best deals on consumer goods & services
  • Get reviews of products, services or even a restaurant near your present location!
  • Find employment
  • Increase awareness of social, economic and environmental issues
  • Emotionally or monetarily give back to those in need
  • Use new technologies to increase skill set
  • Express ourselves creatively

Teens see the value of social media and also see it as a way to stay up-to-date on trends and express themselves.  At the click of a button, they can spread and obtain all kinds of information as well as influence, or be influenced by others.

One such influencer is Jeffree Star (make-up artist, internet celebrity and entrepreneur) has utilized social media platforms such as Twitter, YouTube and Instagram to build an empire and has a net worth in excess of $50M.

Jeffree has been active on social media since 2003 and has built a large and loyal audience:

  • YouTube 12M subscribers
  • Instagram 11.2M followers
  • Twitter 3.3M followers

Jeffree has his own brand of cosmetics and is extremely influential in this market.  His raw and honest makeup reviews are top-notch and can cause products to fly off the shelf if he likes them.

He is just one example of several social media beauty gurus focusing on fashion, hair and beauty related topics that influence male & female teens to young adults.  Teens are being influenced by social media celebrities and then influencing others within their own social network.

Teens spend an average of six to eight hours a day- YES, six to eight hours a day using digital technology. They are becoming less active and more addicted with lower self-esteem, and higher social anxiety.

Studies show that there are many negative effects of social media among teens.  As teens become secluded in their bedrooms mindlessly scrolling through posts, they are becoming less social, and more virtual.  They are focusing on what people are wearing, how they look, where they are at, and what they are buying.  They are starting to become jealous of one another and insecure about themselves.

As we continue to study the effects of social media on teens, there are both pro’s and con’s.  Whichever side of the fence you are on, we can all agree that social media is powerful and continues to grow – the key for a healthy teen is monitoring and moderation!

 

–Follow me on Instagram

Capture-social

Is Facebook good for the world?

It is Facebook’s mission to “To give people the power to build community and bring the world closer together.” says CEO Mark Zuckerberg to The Verge who also shared that a future mission will “develop the social infrastructure to give people the power to build a global community that works for all of us”.

https://www.instagram.com/p/BcixuEoAjpm/?taken-by=kym_mpls

Do you think Facebook is good for the world? After taking this class I thought that I would have a more straight forward answer but I was still surprised when I had to think critically about this.

Facebook Pro’s

  • Even playing field, no one starts at a greater advantage or disadvantage
  • Networking opportunities
  • Can reach a global audience FAST
  • Can create opportunity for social change
  • Can reconnect you with people
  • Can save memories
  • Can remind you of memories
  • Can create awareness
  • Good for businness
  • IT’S FREE!

Con’s

  • Once you put it out there. It’s out there
  • What you put out there now can come back to get you later
  • Not always reliable
    • Fact checks are needed
    • How do you know someone is who they say they are?
  • Time consumption (If you or someone you know might have this problem check out Social Media Addiction)
  • Privacy

My pros outweigh my cons. I think the opportunity to create social change is there, it is up to us to use it! I agree that Facebook is good for the world.

https://www.instagram.com/p/BcizdXuA3gl/?taken-by=kym_mpls

I was happy to see that Facebook wants to do better and that they made a comment section so that they can gain insight. This 2 way communication model could provide them with great feedback.

#Freebie #lastblog #SocialChange #ItIsUpToUs #WeHaveThePlatform