Category Archives: Social Media

Is Facebook good for the world?

It is Facebook’s mission to “To give people the power to build community and bring the world closer together.” says CEO Mark Zuckerberg to The Verge who also shared that a future mission will “develop the social infrastructure to give people the power to build a global community that works for all of us”.

Do you think Facebook is good for the world? After taking this class I thought that I would have a more straight forward answer but I was still surprised when I had to think critically about this.

Facebook Pro’s

  • Even playing field, no one starts at a greater advantage or disadvantage
  • Networking opportunities
  • Can reach a global audience FAST
  • Can create opportunity for social change
  • Can reconnect you with people
  • Can save memories
  • Can remind you of memories
  • Can create awareness
  • Good for businness
  • IT’S FREE!

Con’s

  • Once you put it out there. It’s out there
  • What you put out there now can come back to get you later
  • Not always reliable
    • Fact checks are needed
    • How do you know someone is who they say they are?
  • Time consumption (If you or someone you know might have this problem check out Social Media Addiction)
  • Privacy

My pros outweigh my cons. I think the opportunity to create social change is there, it is up to us to use it! I agree that Facebook is good for the world.

I was happy to see that Facebook wants to do better and that they made a comment section so that they can gain insight. This 2 way communication model could provide them with great feedback.

#Freebie #lastblog #SocialChange #ItIsUpToUs #WeHaveThePlatform

Social Media Addiction

World stream advertising states that “76% of Facebook users visited the site daily during 2016, with over 1.6 billion daily visitors, compared to 70% of daily usage in 2015. (Check out 75 fascinating stats about Facebook here.)”. So social media is thriving, but where should the line be drawn for social media addiction? We should each take the time to check our usage. Be accountable for social interaction virtual or otherwise and call out those who are using social media in excess.

32-Stats-That-Should-Guide-Your-Social-Media-Marketing-Strategy-in-2017-1I think that social media can make us anti social, we can be together but are interacting more with our phones than each other. So how can we address the addiction to mobile devices and social media?

We can start by being aware! If you notice that you are looking at your phone while someone is talking to you, think about if you are actually listening to what they are saying? Be mindful of the amount of time and attention you are giving to social media and the purpose of it.

Each social site has its own function, and can be used uniquely by each of us. I love using LinkedIn to grow my professional network, I have my current position because of it. I like activities I find on Pinterest, decorating ideas and I even have a bucket list. I also use Pinterest as a portfolio. Instagram for posting fun pictures. I never was much for Twitter.

Everyone is using social media in their own way, it could be for news, to connect to family, for business and more. But when should we consider it excessive? Is there a magic number of hours a day? If you watched 50 YouTube Videos today, are we going to send you to YouTuber’s Anonymous? Probably not but you should work on limiting your use, ask yourself is this productive?

You may not notice you have a problem; but might be surprised if you asked others for honest feedback about your usage. What about mobile? Your phone for all purposes, is it glued to you? Do you feel sick when it dies? How many hours a day are you using your phone in some way?

Monitoring your own use can cause you to notice the over usage in others, including children. We should begin making these changes now. More and more places offer Wi-Fi and cell phone coverage has made it hard to be off the grid. We need to make living in the moment a priority.

Technology can also help us take a break sometimes. Xfinity xFi allows customers to pause connection to their home Wi-Fi. It seems like a great idea. I know that I have trouble disconnecting sometimes. I think about the generations that have come after me that don’t know life without the internet or social media. Let’s work on the problem now and not set them up for failure.

So again remember that we should each take the time to check our usage. Be accountable for social interaction virtual or otherwise and call out those who are using social media in excess.

Blog Post 4:
Exercising your public voice: making a case for a position
#blogpost4 #publicvoice #givesocialmediaAbreak #IfNotAddMeToSnapChat

 

 

My Instagram Journey

I have always been slightly skeptical of using social media personally. It seemed to me that everyone gave off a well-manicured façade, where everyone “humble brags” and shares a very specific version of themselves. I have been on Facebook for years as a networking tool, but hadn’t been very interested in Instagram. It didn’t seem like there was anything on Instagram that I couldn’t already do on Facebook. I’m so busy with everything in my life that I hardly needed another distraction.

And yet, here I am, several weeks into using my new Instagram account our social media class at Metro State. I have mixed feelings about my experience so far. On one hand, it’s great to be able to share gorgeous visual snapshots of my life. Using Instagram has made me see the beauty in things both big and small in the world around me. I like having a place where I can share them with people I know.

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Knock.

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On the other hand, what concerns me the most about being on Instagram is that everything I do is turned into data and picked apart by marketers and sales people. It’s no secret that Facebook (who owns Instagram) tracks everything we do and is also continually developing new image recognition technology which already learns faces, but will some day learn places, products and more. Everything I share with the world is archived, digitized and saved on a server and put into an algorithm for analysis.

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Why did the ducks cross the road? #bridge

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I go back and forth on whether or not this troubles me or not. My initial reaction is to be freaked out that I am being watched and my actions analyzed. It makes me feel like my privacy has been violated and I don’t have control over how it gets used. On the other hand, it’s going to help marketers sell things to me more effectively. If it helps them do their job better, and means I get better recommendations, I’m not totally against that. I guess it concerns me that I don’t have transparency in terms of where it’s going and what’s happening.

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First Instagram #selfie.

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I know I’m not going through this journey alone – so I look forward to being a part of the Instagram community in this course. As to what happens after this … I am undecided.

The Manchester Attack and Different Approaches To News Storytelling

Hi everyone,
Like many people, I’ve been walking around with a heavy heart because of the horrifying suicide bombing at the Manchester Arena on Monday. My Facebook news feed has been filled with an endless supply of articles about the attack — breaking updates, recaps, biographies of the victims and opinion pieces. All of this reading has really demonstrated the difference in news storytelling between the more “traditional” news outlets and newer, Millenial-focused publications. The former is still focused on long-form, newspaper-like articles and the latter uses more images, multimedia and information shared in tweet-like tidbits.
Take this article from The New York Times. It’s a great piece that both updates the reader on the increased terror levels as well as give a recap of everything that’s happened since the attack occurred. The voice is formal and professional — it definitely feels like a global newspaper. Moreover, the paragraphs are long and the language is fairly academic. There’s absolutely nothing wrong with this style, as the Times is often considered the best newspaper in the world.
In contrast, there’s this BuzzFeed article. For one thing, it’s a “developing story” type article, which acts more of a social feed. As updates are created by the editorial team, they’ll get pushed to that link. This is nice, because it can be a one-stop-shop for all info on the attack, including the latest updates. There’s also no need to hunt down a bunch of links. But the different tone and style is what is so different from the Times. Beautiful images, embedded social posts and links fill the page. The paragraphs are short, bite-sized and succinct. There doesn’t seem to be a single wasted word. The language also feels like it’s catered for younger, social media-savvy readers.
In conclusion, I am not trying to make a judgement over which style is “better” — although I do appreciate the highly visual, succinct style of the Buzzfeed article — but rather demonstrate how journalism and storytelling are advancing and changing. The Times is sticking with its tried-and-true style, which originated in their newspaper, while Buzzfeed is taking advantage of digital and social media to its full capacity.
Thoughts? Thanks!
Norka

Navigating Social Media Can be a Nightmare for us Older Students

v reali understand nothing

As an older student returning to college after thirty years has been a challenge. Learning how to do and submit class assignments electronically has been a culture shocking experience. Depending on your career prior to returning back to school can make a huge difference in your chances to be a successful student and acquire a degree. I will use my self for an example. Prior to my returning to college i was a furniture mover. I was required to know or use zero social media or electronic communication engines. I did have a Facebook  and an E-mail account. These were the extent of my electronic and social media communication experiences. After taking the placement examination i was placed in the classes appropriated from my scores, OK dandy. Where i immediately hit a road block was navigating D2l and understanding the language of the instructions by the instructor. I was clueless and scared to death. But willing to give this college thing a shot.

My first college essay was due in three weeks and I was determined to write it and turn it in on time. My instructor directed us to turn in our essays via Dropbox by a certain date and time. So i work on my essay with vigor and pride. finally I am done and ready to turn in my first essay. I find my professors office but cant find the dam Dropbox. I looked all over for the dam thing but i found nothing. Well i get to class on Monday, paper was due Friday, pissed off because my instructor did not have her Dropbox where i could access it. I approached her stating that i looked for her Dropbox on Friday and could not find it. She looked at me with a huge smile and said “its OK Albert, stay after class and i will show you how to use the Dropbox on D2l”.\

So since that time i have learned how to navigate D2l, write 8 page essays( with supporting references) and even copy/paste, lol. I am 8 credits away from attaining my BA degree in Org Comm. I figured this should be smooth sailing the rest of the way. Well after walking in MDST 485 i realized how smooth was not gonna happen. I don’t know how to Blog, tweet,re tweet or re- Blog. I am hanging on a thread. However i will learn this stuff but for know, Steve Carell says it best for me.

Will Slack Replace Facebook’s Role In Your Life?

Blog Type #1
As students of this course on social media, we’re spending a lot of time investigating new emerging tools and channels to communicate, network and collaborate with each other. One of the most fascinating ones to me was Slack. I had heard of it in passing, but never had a chance to test it out. From chatting with other classmates, I know I’m not the the only one. We’re all living in something of a digital renaissance and its our collective jobs to decide which social media platforms are meaningful to us.
Along those lines, I wanted to share this article at The Atlantic, a magazine known for critical thinking and digging into global trends. It looks at how Slack could be positioning itself to kill Facebook, which is the long-running giant in the social media world. It talks about how Facebook has always tried to take its competitors features and make them its own (such as the new Facebook Stories, which are a ripoff of Snapchat.) But, Slack is using the same strategy:
Slack has always found useful ways to integrate third-party apps within its service—or, in Slack’s parlance, to reduce the “context switching” that eats away at productivity. But the move also reveals quite a bit about Slack’s larger ambitions, and may hint at the larger direction of the social web. The main point is, Slack doesn’t want you to have to log off—ever. This is a familiar mentality online these days.
It’s a really interesting point of view. And that begs a good question: Could you see Slack replacing Facebook’s role in your life? How about email? Messenger services like WhatsApp? I am curious what everyone’s thoughts are. Personally, I think Slack does offer a lot of features I use, but I already have other apps or places that I prefer. It would take a lot for me to switch.

So much unwanted advice

In the day and age of social media, things like blogs, web pages, Pinterest and Facebook are all peppered with things you should or should not do to raise a child. To spank or not to spank, homeschool, public or private school, are you a creative lunch maker or just a boring sandwich pusher, do you teach them things or let them figure things out on their own, and I could go on and on!

I admit, when I have an issue with my child, I first go to family and friends for advice. But, if I don’t find an answer that seems to fit my situation, I know I can turn to the world wide web. There are many professional child psychologists, pediatricians, nannies, childcare workers and moms that provide sound and calming solutions. It amazes me the wisdom you can glean from these sites. However, when articles pop-up on Pinterest urging you to read it or someone rants on a Facebook post about how they saw a mom doing or not doing something, this barges in on me like a neon sign and tends to irk me more than entice me. Why? Because advice for children is not one-size-fits-all. What my child needs to curb a certain behavior may not work for your child and vice-versa. The fact that a lot of these posts insinuate you are a bad parent if you AREN’T practicing their latest finding is downright maddening.

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Mischievious

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There is pressure for our kids to be the best soccer player, the smartest student in school, the highest jumper, the most advanced in technology and the healthiest of eaters. I miss the days when it was okay for kids to try out a sport and see if they liked it before signing their summer away to be on the team. There is pressure from every angle, even from ourselves, to raise a kid that will overachieve as opposed to just succeed in this world.

Just don’t read the articles!

If only it were easy NOT to notice the articles.  However, because these articles pop up on Facebook, Pinterest, or as a header on a website you are shopping on, it is difficult to ignore the taunts. “What IF I’m doing something wrong?” If you suffer from anxiety or depression these articles can deepen your feelings of inadequacy and make you question everything you are doing or not doing for your child. The internet can be a great tool, a way to connect people with the latest information, but it can also be a dangerous web luring you in to “keep up with the Jones’s.” I think it is okay if you want to post what has worked for your child, but it would be great if you didn’t claim this to be the fix of all fixes and look down your nose to people who don’t share your ideals. I’m grateful that you had the luck to find that magic ticket in your family’s life, I might just try it on my child as well. But if it doesn’t work, or if I find that it isn’t in his best interest, then I will file your idea in my “things that didn’t work” file and move on. Don’t judge, don’t talk behind my back, don’t push your convictions on my family and give people a break for choosing their own path.

toddler

I do my best each day to try to be secure in who I am, what I’m doing and embracing the love and comfort of my family. If the internet is going to keep throwing out pop-up shaming and unsolicited advice, what I may have to re-think is the amount of time I spend on social media.

Social Media is Great, but What about Good, Old Fashioned Book Reading?

pexels-photo-46274.jpeg

Everywhere I look, new advances in technology are being made—and seemingly, this happens every couple months when some unique form of technology appears to solve society’s daily problems. When I was younger, I had an mp3 player (really a glorified USB drive) that used an AA battery and held up to 60 songs at once. Then I owned a Motorola flip phone that I used to text my friends and buy cool ringtones. It fit in my pocket, so it was a huge “level up” from the old, clunky phones my parents talked about.

(Does anyone remember the Nokia phones from the 90s? It’s OK if you do; the 90s were pretty cool!)

With these advances in the early-to-mid 2000s, it’s not surprising that now, in 2016, we’ve soared even higher with our interactive watches, Google Glass, and virtual reality. Through these gadgets, we get the latest and greatest features in social media and have the ability to constantly plug into our Twitter, Facebook, and other social circles. We no longer live in a world where we need to disconnect. Our signal is boost 24/7!

Continue reading Social Media is Great, but What about Good, Old Fashioned Book Reading?

Social Media and Greek Mythology

 

The Greek myths are the most well known stories from ancient history, their stories and characters have influenced man and his decision making for endless years. Many classic tales from the myths have found their way through adaptation in multiple storytelling mediums such as the written novel, the stage play, the motion picture, the comic book, and the video game. This blog post plays the game of Freakonomics( From the novel of the same name by Stephen D. Dubner and Steven Levitt) and makes a comparison between the Greek Gods and contemporary social media.

In the beginning…

In Greek mythology it was not the Gods who created the universe, in actuality the universe itself created the Gods. In the beginning it was all a vast, empty blackness, Chaos had complete control over everything. Somewhere down the road came two children were born from this nothingness as Night and Erebus. As time went on the universe became more defined and other powerful forces were birthed and took control.

Similarly, it was “chaos” to get the first computers up and running and out of the many endless nights eventually came a more defined creation which led to bigger and better things, particularly the creation of the world wide web. Social networking sites have become the staple of the internet, the most used and popular are always linked to by most businesses on their official websites. In other words, what was once a big, empty, black screen has over the years become a very colorful, multi-layered, gateway to information and communication, a world in itself.

I’m going to go out of my way and say that social media sites are, in a way, the Gods of the digital age. Like the Gods of the Greek( Or any other mythology) they provide services to the people of Earth and are always in one way or another sought for, referenced, and used either for business or for personal reasons. They present us with many gifts and tools that at one point in time was not thought possible but for as much good as they can be there’s also possibility of negative outcomes. Big difference between these positive/negative outcomes is that unlike the Gods of Greek mythology social networking sites are not sentient and whatever mistakes or miracles that do happen through them is all on who is using them.

Obviously Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Instagram, Tumblr, and Youtube are the equivalent of Olympians. They rank the highest on search engines( Popular ranking) and must have a seat in the digital age’s equivalent of Mount Olympus( Whatever they might be). Facebook in particular I see as being the equal to Zeus, Facebook is still the king of social media at the moment, as a survey from PCWorld.com suggests it still is (Link: http://www.pcworld.com/article/2908172/facebook-still-king-of-social-media-among-teens.html). It’s relationship with the other popular social medias is, like Zeus’ with the other Olympians, generally good but there is certainly some level of competition and friction between them at times( Like when a new feature is added to one which is quite similar to another’s already existing widget). Every user can share content on their page for one social media to another, which creates a dynamic between the networks which further defines the Olympian unit.

MySpace, as well as other social medias that were once extremely popular that have now fallen from grace are the equivalents of Titans. Titans were once divine beings who controlled the world till one day they were usurped by the younger Olympians. Like the Titans social media like MySpace still exists however they are no longer apart of the “it” crowd and not used for major importance.

Other social media which is birthed from Olympian social media like Twitter or Facebook can be viewed as their offspring the same way as Athena and Apollo were the daughter and son of Zeus. Other social media which was created with major social networking sites along with outside parties could be viewed as demigods in the digital age, quite like a Hercules, who was born from a deity(Zeus) and a mortal woman.

Widgets, special tools for social networking sites, can be viewed similarly to the tools used by the Gods, such as Poseidon’s Trident.

Special and very interesting note – In Greek mythology Zeus was rather split on the creation of human beings to inherit the world, he believed they were capable of doing great many things but also could do bad to themselves and others and over rely on the Olympians. This is a similar to how some people view advancement of technology, they see the potential it can bring to many lives but the potential is there for it to be used in the wrong hands and be bad. This is true with social media because it can be a good tool in the hands of the right person but also do bad in the wrong hands, whether directly or indirectly. As mentioned in an earlier blog post of mine social media can really affect a person’s own mental health.

Any other similarities you guys notice between the digital age and ancient mythology?

Ups and Downs of Uber

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Arrive in style, or dead

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Hey y’all, here goes my attempt at connected writing. Story number 1 tells the tale of Uber, the popular ride-share service, contributing to a decrease in drunken driving deaths in Virginia. One Uber driver is sure that ride-sharing is keeping drunk people off the roads, saying “I’d say I pick up at least 20 drunk people on a given Friday or Saturday night. A lot of people that I’ve given rides to say that if it wasn’t for Uber, they’d chance it and probably drink and drive.” Alcohol related fatalities on the roadway have dropped 22% in Virginia from 2014 to 2015.

This type of story shows Uber as a great service which helps keep people safer.

http://www.wfmynews2.com/story/life/2016/02/21/uber-lyft-may-linked-decrease-drunk-driving-deaths-va/80709198/

Tale number two is quite the opposite. On Feb 21st 2016 in Michigan, an Uber driver is responsible for a shooting rampage that left six dead and two wounded. Jason Dalton started his rampage about 6pm and apparently chose his victims at random over a four hour period at three separate locations in Kalamazoo Michigan. During this time, he continued to pick up Uber riders and drop them off in-between the shootings. One man who got an Uber ride from Dalton at about 8pm tweeted, “Lucky to be alive.”

http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation-now/2016/02/21/reports-gunman-kills-least-6-michigan/80694468/

Despite these two stories happening in different states, the Uber service remains the same. Unstable lunatics like Dalton create tragedy all the time, and I’m not saying it should reflect poorly upon Uber. Could Dalton have been preventing drunken driving deaths at the same time he caused the deaths of his victims? I feel these two stories were kind of intriguing when put side by side. For every up there is a down. Uber is reducing alcohol related fatalities on the road, and there is a dark side.