Tag Archives: Advertising

A Critical Analysis of Retail Cannabis Marketing and Youth

Quinton Miller, Public Relations Major, MDST 485, January 30th, 2021, Post #3 Type #3

Parents of you social media As untrustworthy in the likes of influences on the children. My mother, in fact, did not approve of the possible exposure to different products online. She would fear me ordering weapons, drugs and coming involved in various online communities. My online empoxy business was prevented from creating Facebook ads because it mentioned that knives could be molded out of epoxy for sale. It mentioned in the rejection statements that drugs and weapons were not allowed for paid promotion. Once I removed the items and wording, they reassessed the page and pushed my ads through. This personal experience provides insight to the adversity social media marketing has combat and it’s endeavor to reach new audiences.

Cannabis media groups use educated speakers to spread ideas to specific audience groups here’s an example of a featured guest for an event coming in June of 2021: https://www.instagram.com/p/CN21m-HLOMP/?igshid=jhua7d7nwcnc

The light shun by cannabis companies are reaching adolescence in states where retail cannabis is legal. This is casting an unsavory image on the objectives these these companies. Similar adversities were faced with the advertisement of tobacco products. We know what the result of that was. Tobacco products are no longer allowed to be advertised. Mainly because they seem to target young audiences. The strategy with this was simple, if you find younger people they will become addicted, buy the product longer and result in long term consumers. The cannabis industry could use previous data and examples like these type of studies in order to avoid the same market mistakes of cigarette companies before their ads were banned.

Buying Both Marijuana and Cigarettes are Like Literally Burning Your Money. The Youth Shouldn’t Be Distracted With It.

Not only does this article include part of a survey in which marketing analytics of retail cannabis sales are compiled by use, it also involves tools with the most reach potential. Of those tools, Facebook is at the top of the list. Unfortunately, younger users are at the forefront of the study. I would imagine that the online marketing tools allow for age range options for target audiences desired to be reached. If not, it is imperative to urge social media restrictions of users who do not fit age range to view Cannabis related content. There may also be youth who are dishonest about their ages online. This source will show parents that mistakes can be fixed. It illustrates integrity and maturity for the business’s market.

What other ways do you think Cannabis’s inevitable legalization can be geared in the right direction? Here’s a link to the @MinorityCannabis Instagram post where panelists can contribute questions that will be answered such as these. Will you click to have your input heard?: https://www.instagram.com/p/CN2nzA_r24I/?igshid=u8b9lhqfis9g

Whitehill, J.M., Mareno M.A. (2020) Exposure to Cannabis Marketing in Social Media and Traditional Media and Past-Year Use Among Adolescents in States With Legal Retail Cannabis, Journal of Adolescent, Volume 66, Issue 2, 2020, Pages 247-254 Health Retrieved from: https://doi-org.mtrproxy.mnpals.net/10.1016/j.jadohealth.2019.08.024

Drawing in your audience: The do’s and don’ts of online videos

skip that ad

In this age of short attention spans and endless content for people to choose from, the first moments of an online video can be make or break for drawing in the viewer. I was just reading a post by Google titled The First Five Seconds: Creating TouTube Ads That Break Through in a Skippable World. While the article is based on a study done of online ads on YouTube, I think a lot of the lessons can be useful for anyone sharing video content online.

Careful with that brand

Google tested ads that showed a brand in the first five seconds versus ads which did not and found that the the ads with no branding early on were skipped less. However, the ads which did show the brand early on were recalled more often by viewers, making this a bit of a tricky situation. If you want the audience to watch your entire video, it is probably best to introduce your brand later in the video.

Make them laugh

According to the article, ads which struck a humorous tone were far less likely to be skipped. If you are having a really hard time making your topic funny, your next best bet is creating suspense or evoking emotion. Ads that featured smiling people early on generally fared better than ads that did not. Viewers also like to see a familiar face: if they see someone they recognize in the first five seconds, they are much more likely to watch the video.

Cut the music!

Ads featuring no music in the first five seconds were actually more effective in keeping the viewers’ attention. The article speculates this may be because people are caught off guard by the silence, making the video a kind of sneak attack. For ads that did use music early on, humorous music tended to be the best. Lightheartedness wins again.

I think these tips could definitely come in handy, and not just for those marketing a product or service. Whether you are promoting your business, or advocating for a cause, keeping the viewer interested is a must. Try these tips out on your next video and see if they work. If they don’t work, remember I got them from Google.