Tag Archives: critique

Critiquing the Critique of Deep Adaptation

In 2018, I came across an academic paper entitled “Deep Adaptation: A Map for Navigating Climate Tragedy.” Early in my career I worked as the managing editor of two academic research journals so I understand the process of academic review and what an academic paper looks like (ho hum). This was like no paper I had ever seen before.

“Should you be spending time reading the rest of this article? Should I even finish writing it?”

Continue reading Critiquing the Critique of Deep Adaptation

A Critical Analysis of Retail Cannabis Marketing and Youth

Quinton Miller, Public Relations Major, MDST 485, January 30th, 2021, Post #3 Type #3

Parents of you social media As untrustworthy in the likes of influences on the children. My mother, in fact, did not approve of the possible exposure to different products online. She would fear me ordering weapons, drugs and coming involved in various online communities. My online empoxy business was prevented from creating Facebook ads because it mentioned that knives could be molded out of epoxy for sale. It mentioned in the rejection statements that drugs and weapons were not allowed for paid promotion. Once I removed the items and wording, they reassessed the page and pushed my ads through. This personal experience provides insight to the adversity social media marketing has combat and it’s endeavor to reach new audiences.

Cannabis media groups use educated speakers to spread ideas to specific audience groups here’s an example of a featured guest for an event coming in June of 2021: https://www.instagram.com/p/CN21m-HLOMP/?igshid=jhua7d7nwcnc

The light shun by cannabis companies are reaching adolescence in states where retail cannabis is legal. This is casting an unsavory image on the objectives these these companies. Similar adversities were faced with the advertisement of tobacco products. We know what the result of that was. Tobacco products are no longer allowed to be advertised. Mainly because they seem to target young audiences. The strategy with this was simple, if you find younger people they will become addicted, buy the product longer and result in long term consumers. The cannabis industry could use previous data and examples like these type of studies in order to avoid the same market mistakes of cigarette companies before their ads were banned.

Buying Both Marijuana and Cigarettes are Like Literally Burning Your Money. The Youth Shouldn’t Be Distracted With It.

Not only does this article include part of a survey in which marketing analytics of retail cannabis sales are compiled by use, it also involves tools with the most reach potential. Of those tools, Facebook is at the top of the list. Unfortunately, younger users are at the forefront of the study. I would imagine that the online marketing tools allow for age range options for target audiences desired to be reached. If not, it is imperative to urge social media restrictions of users who do not fit age range to view Cannabis related content. There may also be youth who are dishonest about their ages online. This source will show parents that mistakes can be fixed. It illustrates integrity and maturity for the business’s market.

What other ways do you think Cannabis’s inevitable legalization can be geared in the right direction? Here’s a link to the @MinorityCannabis Instagram post where panelists can contribute questions that will be answered such as these. Will you click to have your input heard?: https://www.instagram.com/p/CN2nzA_r24I/?igshid=u8b9lhqfis9g

Whitehill, J.M., Mareno M.A. (2020) Exposure to Cannabis Marketing in Social Media and Traditional Media and Past-Year Use Among Adolescents in States With Legal Retail Cannabis, Journal of Adolescent, Volume 66, Issue 2, 2020, Pages 247-254 Health Retrieved from: https://doi-org.mtrproxy.mnpals.net/10.1016/j.jadohealth.2019.08.024

A comparison on zombie movies – ([REC] vs Quarantine)

[REC] Trailer – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GAnbWCjmOkA

Quarantine Trailer – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KoBh5S_aWwk

Sets:
The sets from both films are practically identical. So there’s no noticeable differences/effects there.

Scare factor:
This is a rather subjective topic, though both films do a good job of making the viewer much more involved than the stereotypical horror films we’re so used to. Now you could say seeing Rec prior to Quarantine may have made it seem less scary one might experience while watching Quarantine, but the same can be said for the reverse scenario. Though Quarantine has added a few new scares to the mix. Another thing people seem to be constantly complaining about in Quarantine is the final “infected creature” wasn’t nearly as intimidating as the girl in Rec. But how they shoot that final ten minutes still has everyone’s heart pounding.

Gore:
Neither movie is tame when it comes to the graphic factor, but Quarantine is definitely more extreme. With the camera man mauling a zombie, and witnessing a dog in the elevator succumb to the same fate. The effects in both films are amazing, but if you’re simply  looking for bloodshed Quarantine spills  gallons more.

Characters:
First major difference: In Rec the cameraman never makes an appearance, where as in Quarantine the cameraman is seen at least partially multiple times. In both films, the relationship between the reporter (Angela) and the cameraman (Pablo/Scott) is very established. So in Quarantine the relationship isn’t soured the least bit by having Scott on screen from time to time as so many people say it does. In fact, one could say it adds more depth to their relationship.

Second: The two main firefighters (Manu and Alex in Rec, Jake and Fletcher in Quarantine) are quite different between the two films. In Rec, we are meet them and liking them is a given. But we’re not supposed to feel much sympathy for them. Where as in Quarantine gives us more face time with the two at the beginning at the fire station so we feel more of a loss when they’re taken out of the picture.

Third: The reporter (Angela) is somewhat likable in both films, but in Rec she has a bitchier, more career-oriented attitude. Where as in Quarantine, Angela is younger, less seasoned, and overall a nicer person. Both can characters play the lead role quite well, but Quarantine’s Angela seems to feel the impact of the situation and has a genuine fear. As shown in the scenes displaying her mental breakdown. Neither portrayal is better than the other, they are just two slightly different Angela’s.

Fourth: The residents differ slightly, but does it matter? Everyone dies in the end anyways! However in Quarantine the residents do play a larger role as the group slowly gets picked off.

Story:
From shot to shot, there isn’t much variation between the two films– but there are a few things one would notice on a second or third viewing. Such as added scenes and dialogue at the fire station in Quarantine to make us identify with the main group of characters further. There is also more creature set-pieces in Quarantine, to be more specific the old lady watching television scene, and the “infected” dog in the elevator scenes. One big change between the two is the origin of the infection. Which one is better is something you must decide for yourself.  Personally I lean in Rec’s because it’s the original. When viewing Quarantine be on the watch for the extra scenes as really do add that extra impact when it comes to character depth and relation.

Now on to the real question.
(Since you most likely just scrolled all the way through looking for a snip-it to reply /post your opinion on.)

Which film do you think was better, scared you more, or was more realistic? If you’ve seen both that is. Also how did you feel about Rec 2 and Quarantine 2?