Tag Archives: equality

Captain Marvel: Earth’s Mightiest Hero

Warning: This post contains (mild) spoilers.

Yesterday, Rick and I went to see Captain Marvel in theaters.

Strangely, I’d heard almost nothing about it after it was released on March 8th. The only thing that had passed through my social media was some headline about an old white guy upset about the MCU’s mightiest hero being a woman.

Over dinner last week, my dad, who coincidentally is also an old white guy, and who has not yet seen the movie, expressed his own confusion about Captain Marvel being a woman. Having grown up with the kind of Captain Marvel who starts out as a little boy, shouts “Shazam!” and channels the powers of several ancient male heroes by morphing into a well-muscled, fully-grown man, he wondered how all of that was going to work.

First of all, there’s no reason a girl couldn’t channel the powers of male heroes, given the opportunity–their maleness and their powers are not mutually inclusive. Secondly, I’m not sure what the deal is with kids having to grow into adults in order to use their powers (this also confused me when I first read the W.i.t.c.h. series).

But, most importantly, DC’s Captain Marvel/”Shazam” is not the same character as Marvel’s Captain Marvel. And, as I’ve learned from my good friend Wikipedia (because I am in fact not a comic book nerd), Carol Danvers (Captain Marvel’s civilian identity) has been a fixture of Marvel Comics since 1977, when she first appeared as Ms. Marvel, in a new series of that name, after having gained her powers from events that transpired in the Captain Marvel comics. She finally took up the mantle of Captain Marvel herself in 2012 (although it appears there were a couple other women who also held Captain Marvel’s title and/or powers, at some point or another). So, yes, the first Captain Marvel was a guy, but Carol Danvers certainly has a legitimate claim to the role.

And Marvel nailed it with this movie.

It is the most normal movie I have ever seen.

“Vers” (played by Brie Larson) as she’s known when the story begins, is apparently an alien soldier from another planet, fighting a war against another race of aliens called Skrulls. When the Skrulls capture her and take her to 1990’s Earth (this is a prequel), she works with a young Nick Fury to find and defeat the Skrulls before they can infiltrate Shield and steal an essential piece of technology.

It sounds pretty straightforward, for a superhero mission, but along the way, Vers, who can’t remember anything about her past and has trouble controlling her powers (read: obeying; getting things right), manages to discover who she is and what she is really capable of.

I cried watching her self-actualization play out. This wasn’t a story about a woman being powerful despite being a woman or because she was a woman. This was a story about a human being–who just miraculously happened to look and act like me–realizing their full potential.

Brie Larson is beautiful, make no mistake, but they don’t make her up like a supermodel (cough cough, Wonder Woman), and she’s dressed from head to toe in a practical uniform which sufficiently protects her from both the elements and the vacuum of space. She’s fit, like I imagine anyone with military training would be, but she looks like a normal person, not somebody’s ridiculous ideal.

And our hero’s defining relationship? Carol Danvers’s friendship with Maria Rambeau, a black single mother and badass pilot, replaced what could have easily been a meaningless long-lost love interest, if this were a different movie.

Captain Marvel, despite the horrendous line of advertisement I found on this AMC theater page, is not a “(her)o.” What a strange and belittling advertisement for such an amazing and worthy character.

She is a hero.

Captain Marvel is smart, brave, and human, in addition to having powers on par with those of DC’s Superman. I’m excited to see her take down Thanos in Avengers: End Game next month.

In the meantime, go see Captain Marvel. (Go experience it in IMAX, too.)

Take your friends and your children with you.

Everyone should see this movie.

Gender Neutral Bathrooms are a “No Brainer”

I don’t understand the fuss about allowing a person to use a bathroom that matches the gender that they identify themselves as. A person’s gender is what they say it is. Long gone are the days when your birth assignment dictated your career choices and marital roles. Here we are in 2017 where equal rights in America are supposed to be for all of us regardless of our gender , sexual preference or economic class. So why is it an issue that transgendered people cant use the bathroom they identify with. We have law makers writing Bills designating people to use bathrooms that correspond to the sex assigned at birth. Well that’s discrimination and downright unfair.

I understand the challenges that opponents fear will occur with allowing persons to use bathrooms they identify with. Example being a weirdo that uses the women’s room for some sick self sexual gratification. However, those types will find ways to be sexually inappropriate regardless to the sign on the door. Or a bigger issue with High school athletes/students who are transgender. Finding showers and locker room assignments that are fair and comfortable for everyone. These issues were being worked out.

The new guidelines, that allowed students to use bathrooms they identified with, which were set by our last president have been revoked by our new President. These such actions /behaviors are supported by organizations such as American Family Associations. AFA are strong advocates of keeping values this country once held at our forefront. Values that that take rights away from the American people. Whether they are they are campaigning to boycott Target for allowing gender free bathrooms or Boycotting Ellen because she is gay. I oppose anything or anyone supporting inequalities and unfair actions on anyone.

 

https://www.gannett-cdn.com/-mm-/d44bf9ac740cfa2e4c015e985cf20e4ec8d6fdc9/r=540/http/videos.usatoday.net/Brightcove2/29906170001/2016/05/29906170001_4892231119001_GettyImages-530594532.jpg

BLOG3

#hellohumanrights

As you have probably heard, Target recently updated their company policy on bathroom usage to be trans-inclusive. To those promoting the social media campaign against this, I say:

If you don’t like Target’s bathroom policy, then don’t use their bathroom.
No one is trying to make you!

Screen Shot 2016-04-30 at 7.47.24 AMBut, don’t try to restrict other people’s right to use a bathroom where they feel comfortable.

You are overly privileged to live in a country and world that has considered it a right for you to be comfortable. This socio-cultural phenomenon is called heteronormativity.

When you experience a tiny discomfort you expect the rest of the world to fight for what is your gendered privilege.

What if you were on the other side?

What if society existed in such a way where you were never comfortable to use a public restroom because of your gender identity. Stop being so selfish!

Don’t say ‪#‎byetarget‬ or ‪#‎boycotttarget‬ Say ‪#‎HelloHumanRights‬

LGBT Internment Camps in Our Future?

On April 28th, 2016 The Washington Times posted an article on their website entitled “Gay Census a mixed bag for LGBT people”.

First of all, in regard to the title, I take issue with the differentiation between gay people and frankly… people. It is easy to differentiate ourselves based on labels and while fighting for a cause, one can also easily envelop themselves in that differentiation. This is an inherent flaw in our (English) lingual system. This discussion on labels, however, is for another post, on another day.

The first sentence of this post reads: “Lawmakers want the U.S. Census Bureau to start counting gay people — but not all gay people are convinced they want to be counted”.

Why might that be? Perhaps history tells us that this is dangerous territory. Predominantly White led America has historically and continues to segregate Aboriginal Tribes people for their land and other resources; during World War Two America placed over 127 thousand people of Japanese descent into internment camps; after kidnapping them from their homes in Africa, taking them across the world to unknown land, and enslaving them for years, America proceeded to develop a transit infrastructure system that was and is racially segregating America. These are only a few of the blatant segregating acts of the U.S. government.

All this is to say, that these fears of registering as gay, are founded!

What assurances do people have that this won’t happen to them?

I further take issue with current policy of the census. What business does the census bureau have knowing what your genitalia is? I personally don’t think what you have in your pants is any of their business. But, the government wants to take it a step further. They also wish to know what genitalia you prefer. This is an issue of rights to privacy.

On the one hand, I think that America is obsessive in its over sexualization of nudity. On the other hand, it is also each person’s right to choose who knows about their genitals.

This movement is being “touted … as a way to address more effectively the needs of the LGBT community” by proponents. While I can see ways that this could benefit the public, I also recognize that once people give this information up they lose all control over how it is used. In the era we live with widespread concerns over data privacy and constant attack of those systems, anyone with Malevolent intentions could access those data. This poses a concern for all Americans.

Another valid point is that, those who come out as LGB and/or T are a self-selecting group. Many people simply will not come out, even in the face of a government mandate. Expecting them to do so is not only inconsiderate and unfair, it’s flat foolish and ignorant.

This article did mention some possible positive outcomes that could come of this in the forms of legitimization and inclusion. While important, it seems that the overarching issues of government meddling; propensity for inaccuracy in the data; and security risks shadow any potential benefits and do not create a justified foundation for this movement.

Screen Shot 2016-04-30 at 7.47.08 AM

What do you think?
Tell me in the comment section below.