Tag Archives: music

1: The link between music and health

It’s no surprise that music has the ability to fight depression—but did you also know it has the ability to improve blood flow and lower your levels of cortisol (a stress-related hormone)? Even listening to music before surgery can improve post-surgical results.

All the technical language summed up is that is activates chemicals in the brain that make you feel good and helps regulate emotion and memory. The benefits of music can be compared to meditation. Both had outstanding improvements involving mood and quality of sleep. Let’s be honest, more people would much rather listen to music than partake in meditation.

BUT, music also has the ability to make us incredibly nervous. (Cue the Halloween theme song). In that case, silence would be better than listening to something random. Some music can also encourage negative emotions in us such as anger and aggression. The rhythm and other musical elements have the ability to change our brain’s activity just like it can do the opposite and make us feel good. So confusing, I know.

Just like you would expect, slow tempo music with gradual chord progressions make us feel calm whereas chaotic, up-tempo music can do the opposite. To make matters a little more complicating, not everyone is the same. While some people may think AC/DC is too hectic, some people claim for that to be their relaxation music. http://time.com/5254381/listening-to-music-health-benefits/

“Leve Som Dem”

Hej. Mit navn er Mariah, og jeg kan godt lide den farv grøn. Jeg snakker dansk ikke godt, men jeg lærer det. Jeg har lært det i et år. Jeg underviser mig selv med Duolingo. Jeg er ikke en “polyglot” (de taler meget sprogene flydende) men jeg ønsker at være en dag.

Hi. My name is Mariah, and I like the color green. I don’t speak Danish well, but I am learning it. I have learned it for a year [on and off–I’m worse at practicing than I like to think]. I am teaching myself with Duolingo. I am not a “polyglot” (they speak many languages fluently) but I wish to be one day.

Watch this excellent TED talk by Lýdia Machová on the secret to becoming a polyglot.

One of the things that I do to make language learning fun is to listen to music and learn the lyrics. I recently found the Danish version of “Part of Your World” from The Little Mermaid on YouTube, and was excited to discover that, by the fifth listen or so, I could understand some of the lines and sing along.

It’s not an exact translation from the English version–even the title of the song, “Leve Som Dem,” means “live like them,” not “part of your world”–but it’s even more interesting, because the Danish version still rhymes. While the lyrics were altered from an exact translation, they still have roughly the same meaning, and they also maintain that sort of musical poetry that we would expect in a Disney/children’s song. That’s super cool on a number of different levels.

I really want to find a copy of the whole movie. The utter appropriateness of a Danish Little Mermaid is indescribably appealing.

(I’m a total nerd, so I couldn’t write an introductory post without going all-in. So hey. Hi. This is me. Nice to meet ya.)

Benefits of Social Media On: Music Artists

It is obvious by now that social media has taken over the way that people and companies advertise and communicate, but how? The changes are significant and have their benefits. In this three-part blog series, I will be explaining the benefits of social media’s influence on three major subjects: visual media, music artists, and businesses. These posts will hopefully be informative to those who don’t know about the benefits in relation to these topics, as well as entertain those who do know the benefits, and hopefully teach them something they don’t know. 

Welcome!

In the last post I talked about the benefits of social media on visual media. This time, I will explain how social media benefits aspiring musicians and musician’s fanbases.

Musicians of the past few decades found fame through touring extensively and getting their music on the radio. Their goal was also to get signed to a record label and create music videos that would hopefully be featured on T.V. With the advancement of technology and social media presence in the daily lives of people, appealing to a wider audience is now easier than ever. Musicians are now able to spread the word of a band or single artists through platforms such as Facebook, Instagram, Spotify, Bandcamp, Soundcloud, and more. Most of these platforms allow you to upload your own content without the help of anyone else and allow anyone to consume your content (either for free or for a fee).  This was not always true seeing as how, in the past, an artist would have to have to work through someone (typically a label) to promote their music and make it available for the masses. This makes it easier for independent artists to really make a name for themselves and for more people to even create and promote their own record labels.

Another marketing benefit of social media for musicians is more personally oriented. From a relational standpoint, musicians can now show much more of their personality and share their experiences with their fans than before. This can lead to more involvement, higher outreach, and better sales for their music. Brandon Seymour of indieonthemove.com makes a good point about this, saying “As a band, you have the unique opportunity to be the “tastemaker” for your audience. Step outside the box and incorporate some non-band-related content that you find interesting and chances are your followers will find it interesting too” (Seymour 2013). Being able to appeal to people even when it isn’t about music, can make the community support stronger. This improved involvement of fans can also lead to higher satisfaction as a result of feedback.

Social media can also lead to the spreading of knowledge as well as the expansion of networks. The tradition of spreading fliers for an upcoming show is not dead, but it is seriously overshadowed by the implementation of social media posts and event pages. Facebook specifically, has an event page system that engages people who are planning on attending and provides all the information they need about said event. These event pages can be shared between friends and grow in attendance. When a band posts that they are having an event, friends can ‘tag’ each other in the comments to get their attention. As said simply by David Meerman Scott in The New Rules of Marketing and PR, “When you tag people, they get notifications that point them to the tagged content. Isn’t that great? When you create something interesting, your friends can spread it for you!” (Scott 2017). These tags can allow for people to see new bands they have never heard about including aspiring new bands.

There are so many positive uses of social media for musical artists including, product/music promotion, personal artist-fan interaction, spreading of knowledge and networks, and more. I did not touch on everything but hopefully this will get you thinking about how much social media can help aspiring artists.

Next blog, I will talk about the impact of social media on businesses.

 

Sources:

https://www.indieonthemove.com/blog/2013/10/5-ways-bands-and-musicians-can-leverage-social-media

The New Rules of Marketing and PR by David Meerman Scott (2017)

 

ArtPuke …makes sense to me

Last March, you might have heard that Lady Gaga’s performance at the South By Southwest Music Festival (SXSW) included her getting puked on by professional vomit artist Millie Brown during the song “Swine” from the most recent album, “ArtPop.” 

Yuck, right?

I mean, yeah. My little sister posted the video on my Facebook and after watching it, I immediately deleted it from my page and memory.

Everyone freaked out.

Demi Lovato was perhaps the loudest critic, posting a Tweet saying “Sad… As if we didn’t have enough people glamorizing eat disorders already. 😦 Bottom line, it’s not “cool” or “artsy” at all.” 

TMZ posted a video and a few sentences about it, calling Gaga’s “antics” “sick” and “ridiculous.” 

But have you heard the song? It is disgusting. The voice in the song is disgusted by herself, by who she is referring to, and the whole story the lyrics tell. Gaga is singing about feeling vile and violated:

Hush up, don’t speak, don’t wanna hear another (not another word from you)
You’re just an ani-mal trying to act real special (but deep down you are just a shrew)
Maybe I should have a little more just to stay out of my mind
‘Cause it’s when I’m not thinking with you that I act like a swine….
I know, I know, I know, I know you want me
You’re just a pig inside a human body
Squealer, squealer, squealer, you’re so disgusting
You’re just a pig inside…
(Read full lyrics)

So the world was horrified, not for the first time, at this craaaaaaaaazy thing Gaga did. (Even I was a little offput, but for me it was the first time.)

Then as I blasted the song in my car for the millionth time, and as I felt disgusting, and I got it. What’s going to make you feel nastier than getting puked on? Giving your body over to someones raging lust is disgusting. Vile. Offensive. 

The puke was perfect. 

Is art not symbolic? Is it not meant to evoke strong feelings? Is it confusing and controversial at times? Misread? But that’s okay- that’s the point of art: that it is up for interpretation.

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(Read about how Gaga defended herself after the public uproar)

[this is blog post type 3]