Tag Archives: trash

Trash on trash on trash

The Issue

The world is turning into a giant garbage can, no doubt, and it’s getting worse. Scientists surveyed the islands of Cocos (in the Australian territory) and estimated there’s about 414 million pieces of plastic which could weigh up to 262 tons. Among the garbage was almost one million shoes and hundreds of thousands of toothbrushes. Straws and plastic bags made up a quarter of the total. Another study noted that there were more pieces of plastic in the ocean than stars in the Milky Way.

The scale of the problem is getting so bad that it seems almost impossible to clean up the beaches. It’s time consuming, costly, and thousands of new pieces of plastic wash up even after you’ve just cleaned it. The solution now is to reduce the distribution and consumption of plastic so that it doesn’t enter our oceans in the first place. I applaud the cities in Minnesota that are banning Styrofoam containers and eliminating plastic straws. We need people to be aware that we can’t stop pollution from happening, but we can certainly slow it down.

In the lower left quadrant of the photo, you can see a piece of trash on the edge of the water
Just like you wouldn’t litter in a place like Rocky Mountain National Park, let’s have that same mentality closer to home

https://www.newsweek.com/remote-barely-inhabited-islands-are-drowning-millions-pieces-plastic-trash-1427325

Effects on animals

Another issue in itself is how all this garbage affects wildlife. A pregnant sperm whale washed up, dead, on an Italian beach. When scientists and veterinarians cut her open, they found a dead baby whale along with 50 pounds of plastic in her stomach. The plastic filled up more than two thirds of her stomach and potentially died because the nutrients from the food never made it past the blocked intestines.

https://www.nationalgeographic.com/environment/2019/04/dead-pregnant-whale-plastic-italy/

Deepest point of the ocean

If for some reason that information didn’t spark something inside you, take this in. Victor Vescovo set a record on becoming the first American to descend deeper into the ocean than any person before him. He and his dive team were more than 35,850 feet below the surface of the Mariana Trench—the deepest point in the Earth’s oceans. That’s nearly 7 miles! That’s a similar distance between Metro State and Hidden Falls Regional Park “as the crow flies” (straight shot, not based on driving directions). Vescovo spent four hours at the bottom mapping new routes for future researchers and among the bottom? Trash. While a single piece of plastic isn’t going to single-handedly kill the ocean species, it’s a reminder on the impact human’s have and how far it reaches.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/science/2019/05/15/he-went-where-no-human-had-gone-before-our-trash-had-already-beat-him-there/?utm_term=.c6ffa8a61aa8

It’s Time to Save the World

“Is my English OK? Is the microphone on?” asked Greta Thunberg, in one of her most recent addresses. “Because I’m beginning to wonder.”

Laughter from the audience.

It wasn’t a joke. No one seems to be listening.

Nine years ago, when I was Greta’s age, I wasn’t aware. I wasn’t politically, globally, socially, environmentally aware. I wasn’t aware of what our biggest problems were–or that I, as a kid, could do anything about it, even if I did know what was happening in the world.

Nine years ago, I was LARPing (live-action role playing). For those who don’t know, LARP is a game wherein you create a character for yourself, dress up in costume, and run around in the woods at night, fighting faux villains with foam sticks. It’s like playing make-believe in the backyard when you were little, but on a larger scale, with maybe a better production value.

LARP comes in a number of forms, but the game I played was mostly like Dungeons & Dragons. It was a fantasy game. Swords and sorcery. Lightning bolts. Storming the castle. All of that.

While I knew that the events in the game weren’t “real” and that the character I played wasn’t “real,” they always felt important. They felt bigger than the small “reality” I actually lived in. I often felt that my character was better than me. She was stronger, prettier, freer. She had more goodness in her; more to give. I wanted to be like her in real life.

This disconnect–the idea that my character was false and somehow separate from me–affected my growth in a number of ways. I could write a book on it. There’s a lot to unpack. But the point here is that even after I managed to quit the game, I had a hard time developing an idea of who I was without that character.

Recently, with the changing of the seasons, I was hit by a wave of nostalgia. It would be the start of LARP season now, if I was still playing.

I’m still sorting through it, but one of the things that finally occurred to me was that I could be like the heroic character I used to play. I already was like her. She came from me.

But there were still situational differences, systematic differences between that character’s world and mine, dragging me down.

I posted this on Facebook:

larp

And, only days later, the sentiment was echoed by somebody else:

dnd

I’ve been flailing for a solution. Something I could do to help the environment, and reconcile the reality of my apparent helplessness with the idea of once having played at being someone courageous and able to create change.

In this video, Jane Goodall advises people to act locally. “Quite honestly,” she says, “if you think globally, you get depressed.” Break it down, then. Start with what you know you can do. Do something. Even if it might seem small. “We’re all interconnected.”

I’ve been worrying myself sick. I woke up today with a sore throat, and a headache, presumably from my newfangled teeth grinding habit. In an anxious, somewhat dissociated haze, I drove to the store for some groceries, just to get out of the house. Everywhere, meat and dairy. Things packaged in plastic. Delicious things that I only felt bad about craving. I bought one of those chocolate bars that claims to help endangered species, and felt doubtful about its impact, but I hoped.

On my way home, it seemed like all I could see was trash. Scattered along the side of the road, accumulating in the ditches, washed up along the curb. Plastic bags blowing in the wind and caught up in bushes.

Enough is enough.

I found a metal stick–one of those garden hooks for hanging bird feeders or little candle pots–and I filed the end to a point on my dad’s bench grinder. I walked across the street to the park outside my house, and I attacked the garbage in the rain garden. I chased it through the foliage, piercing it with my makeshift rapier, collecting its remains.

Maybe this will help.

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Photo by Robert Stuart Lowden

I’m an adventurer. It’s my job.

And for all the shitheads out there who consume without thinking, and leave their trash lying around; for the people who continue to make a mess of the world, I have just one message:

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