Tag Archives: food

Lawmakers ban feeding the homeless

Since when is it a crime to help another person in need out?

People have been getting charged with misdemeanors for sharing food out in public. I understand that the spreading of Hepatitis is a problem, but there are other ways to go about the situation. The lawmakers should be putting their efforts into educating the public to helping in the proper way and how to cleanly hand out food.

Lawmakers are going straight to not allowing people to provide for those who can’t afford it, which isn’t helping those who have been getting Hepatitis because they are taking their meal away all together and additionally punishing those who are out in the world trying to do good and help others. It logically doesn’t make sense. They are concerned about a mess being left behind when there are bigger worries at stake. Solving the problem of having starving people and spreading education should be priority to marking people’s records.

Some of these cities are taking it even further to banning sitting or sleeping in public spaces. I don’t see incarcerating someone for sitting in public doing anyone any good or preventing Hepatitis A. Anybody should be allowed to sit out in public as a part of their rights. These areas are known for common areas for people to collectively be in. Some people don’t have options and if they are cold or starving or emotionally drained in need for human contact they should have the option to be out in public areas.

http://www.newsweek.com/illegal-feed-criminalizing-homeless-america-782861

Blog 4

https://nypost.com/2018/02/04/doritos-to-make-lady-friendly-chips-that-dont-crunch-for-women/

The New York Post released an article that depict the subject of Doritos plans on making “lady-friendly” chips that won’t crunch. Apparently, women dislike the sound of crunch and something less messy. Also stating that “women” dislike the idea of having to like their fingers after consuming chips. The idea of Doritos generalizing “women” and their likes and dislikes is infuriating. The global chief, Indra Nooyi is implying that “although women would love to crunch [chips] loudly, lick their fingers and pour crumbs from the bag into their mouth afterwards, they prefer not to do this in public,” (2018, para. 2.) I’m assuming that the Doritos team and/or the New Your Post is targeting a specific age group of women because, I know multiple women who loves chips for their crunch, taste, and most of all, licking the flavors off their fingers. Though the idea of licking your fingers in public may disturbing or looked down upon (especially for girls, because we all know the double standards society has for women,) it is one of the best part about eating chips. Also, I think that the intentions behind this “invention” is probably well intended but, in it’s own ways, it has pushed it even further towards gender stereotypes. It’ll be even more ironic if the team who decided all this is a group of women who is trying to include women as a whole but, in response to that, it’s the opposite. I would argue that the author of this post is pretty neutral. If anything, they’re just trying to throw the news out there through this article, it is not bias nor favoring one side of a story. Something that the author left out was the input of men. Though, I would understand why. This article as a whole is already about discriminating women and/or targeting them, there’s no need to hear the inputs of male. Who, in the article, opinion’s does not matter because this isn’t chips for them. Men’s opinion has always been added to news outlet, I think that the fact that they left out men’s input in general, makes sense.

Invest In Yourself

Who doesn’t want to feel good? No matter what your age, race, gender, weight, healthy eating in combination with exercise will positively impact YOUR overall health. Yes, I said YOU. There are so many other weight loss products on the market right now that promise miraculous weight loss and boost in energy. The only promise they will fulfill is a dent in your bank account. The only proven way to look and feel better is through good old fashioned eating healthy in combination with exercise.

food_exercise

Think of eating healthy as an investment to your body. Eating out is not only expensive but can lead to poor food choices. The top 5 benefits of eating healthy according to Heathline.com highlight why committing to a healthy diet can be one of the best decisions you’ve ever made.

1) Controls weight

2) Improves mood

3) Combats disease

4) Boots energy

5) Improves longevity

I get it, everyone has really busy schedules, but the gym doesn’t have to be a huge time commitment. The top 5 benefits of exercise according to naturalbalancefoods.co.uk highlight why adding just 30 minutes of exercise 3-5 times per week can change your life.

1) Get a natural high

2) Sleep better

3) Look good

4) Get a healthier mind

5) Improve your health

Do all of these benefits sound like something you are interested in? There are obvious benefits to each action but you cannot be successful with one without the other. Imagine the endless possibilities that eating healthy in combination of exercise will bring to your life.

Do Food Trucks Have Safe Food?

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I work in downtown St. Paul and over the last couple of years the number of food trucks has increased throughout the area at lunchtime. I see the number of people waiting in line to get food.  I look at the menu boards and think that the prices are reasonable, but I often times wonder, how clean and safe is the food that is being prepared.

Large corporations have jumped on the band wagon and are using food trucks for catering to their employees in their parking lots. This new style of catering is cheaper than paying a catering business within the company. This also keeps their employees on-site which means fewer employees are traveling to restaurants for lunch. The only drawback is that corporations may need to work with the cities they reside in because of city ordinances.  Some cities such as St. Louis Park, Bloomington, Burnsville and Lakeville have changed ordnances to resolve this issue in order for food trucks to sell in the suburbs.

I found that the Minnesota Department of Health (MDH) has a process that is quite extensive and you really have to a strategy and plan if you want to run a food truck at least 30 days in advance of construction of a truck. You also have to purchase licenses, meet NSF standards for equipment, dishwashing and hand washing facilities, water supply and liquid waste disposal plans that are not hazardous to public health.

In 2012, CBS investigated food truck safety and noted that legitimate food trucks should have a license displayed where people can see it and they need to have an inspection a minimum of one time per year. Inspectors found food temperatures to be the most common problem, but other issues could be heating lamps not working properly, melted ice cube tubs holding soft drinks spreading germs from hands onto the counter, and chemicals used for cleaning that did not have proper labeling and could potentially be mixed with food bottles. In all, even though there were minor issues, they say that none of these issues would be life threatening and that food trucks are relatively safe.

I’m not saying that there aren’t salmonella or other bacterial issues, but after researching food safety on the food trucks, I am now more inclined to purchase food on the streets next time a see a food truck.

 

 

Hunger

When you hear the word hunger, what do you think of? If you’re like most people, you think of that empty feeling in you have in the pit of your stomach sometime between your bowl of Cheerios at 8:00 AM and your turkey sandwich at noon. But hunger has another definition. Merriam-Webster defines it as, “a strong desire for something or to do something.” For people trying to solve the problem of food insecurity in our community, it is that second definition that drives them. Providing for the immediate needs of hungry families is an absolute necessity, but solving the underlying problems that lead to food insecurity, and the problems that are a result of it, is an even bigger challenge.

Solving the problem of hunger in Minnesota will require more from each of us than buying an extra box of spaghetti at the grocery store and placing it in the bin. Knowing who in your community is at risk or currently suffers from food insecurity is a start. Reaching out to them is the next step. Compassion. Understanding. Communication. These are the things that will help eradicate the stigma that is sometimes associated with food insecurity and will allow those who need help seek it without fear of being shamed or judged in the check-out line at Cub. No one should have to be embarrassed to accept help.

The recession has pushed social services, community service providers, and our food shelves to their very limits. Visits to food shelves by Minnesota seniors has more than quadrupled since 2008 and 1 in 6 Minnesota children live in hunger. There are too many people in need and not enough resources to meet those needs. Innovative programs like Second Harvest Heartland’s Harvest To Home are helping to reduce waste by collecting fresh unsold or un-harvested fruits and vegetables from farmers and farmer’s markets and using them to feed our local, hungry neighbors. Big problems call for big thinkers and big solutions. What are you hungry for?