Tag Archives: Social Media

Why The (2017) “The Mummy” Is A Shell of An Adventure

#BLOG 3

INTRO

The review produced by Screenrant tries hard to give “The Mummy” movie a bone but ends up killing it even faster. The honest truth of the matter, “The Mummy” tries to be something it’s not and doesn’t even do that well. Giving the audience five reasons why the movie was bad and why it was good.

  1. A Disappointingly Small Scale:

Oddly enough for a movie called The Mummy, the story spends very little time in Egypt, or anywhere comparable, and, instead, sets the majority of its action sequences somewhere around Surrey, England. Which doesn’t really spell rip-roaring adventure to most people.

Even when the movie reaches the streets of London for its third act, the sets and locations feel quite limited, and the color palette is remarkably grey and monotonous.

Response: The movie shouldn’t have been set in England in the first place. At least with the last Mummy movie with Branden Frasier, it was based in China with a Chinese mummy. It makes total sense and at no point are you confused. Was the Dragon Emperor a good film like its predecessors? Sort of, but not quite.However, The Dragon Emperor has many redeeming qualities that make it a worthwhile watch.

  1. Isn’t: Tom Cruise Has Still Got It

There are few movie actors left in the business who have the star power of Tom Cruise and, at age 54, he still brought some much-needed charm to The Mummy.

Not only could Cruise sell moments of tension and action, but his all-around enthusiasm for the process energizes the wearier aspects of the movie in a way that few actors possibly could have.

Response: I’ll be honest, I don’t really know much about Tom Cruise, and that’s OK. Although I did like him in “Interview with a Vampire”. He was very mysterious in his villainy. Although in this movie, he’s just not the guy for the role or anybody for that matter.

  1. Generic Screenwriting

Despite some very talented screenwriters working on the project, The Mummy fails to stand out from the blockbuster crowd and this is mostly its own fault.

The popular MacGuffin of a magic rock is introduced almost immediately in the movie and a predictable course of events feels secondary to the movie’s desire to flesh out a fictional universe that audiences will never actually get to see.

Response: The plot was flat; you don’t need to beat around the bush. This director completely misses the essence and fun of the other films. Branden Frasier, along with the rest of its cast, added too much flavor to the franchise just for it to taste bland.

  1. Stunts

Tom Cruise’s dedication to stuntwork on his own movies is well documented and The Mummy is no different. Having the lead actor actually get inside as many of the action shots as they can brings a lot to a movie and it helps this one feel like more of a romp.

Though a lack of originality holds it back, The Mummy is a movie that’s always trying to be entertaining in an almost slapstick kind of way and the physicality of the action adds a lot of personality to the comedy.

Response: “The Mummy” Franchise is not Mission Impossible, a James Bond movie, a spy movie, Jason Born, or Taken. It’s literally a fantasy adventure, and that’s all it ever was.

  1. Tasteless Updates to the Story

For a movie presenting so many distinct time periods and cultural icons, you’d think The Mummy would present at least one of them in a satisfying way.

Aside from sidelining Egypt, and needlessly adding medieval English history to the mix, the movie makes the particularly tasteless choice to set its opening action sequence in modern-day Iraq with a force that is, while stereotypically faceless and nameless, essentially ISIS.

Response: Making more vibrant environments would have helped the film.

  1. A Combined Monster Universe Isn’t a Bad Idea

While The Mummy often fails to frame it in an appealing way, the central idea of the movie isn’t a bad one. Universal alone had been doing monster team-ups and crossovers for just shy of three-quarters of a century before the movie came out.

The movie’s idea to unify everything through what would almost certainly be its Nick Fury figure, Dr. Jekyll/Mr. Hyde and a S.H.I.E.L.D.-like organization with its own potential to spin-off and become evil, there are some entertaining promises made. Even if they’re only just that.

Response: Creating a creature feature universe from other monster franchises wasn’t a terrible concept. What was a terrible concept was using “The Mummy” as its basis to debut. The titles below are all the movies that would have been in theaters if Warner Bros. hadn’t ditched the project. I think Dr. Jeckyll and Mr. Hyde could have been a smash hit!

  • The Dark Universe Begins – and Ends. Universal Pictures. …
  • Van Helsing. Universal Pictures. …
  • Johnny Depp’s Invisible Man. Universal Pictures. …
  • Phantom of the Opera and Hunchback. Universal Pictures. …
  • Dwayne Johnson’s The Wolfman. …
  • Creature from the Black Lagoon. …
  • The Bride of Frankenstein.
  1. It Borrows Very Heavily from Much Better Things

Arguing over how original the story really is is something that you could do with every version of The Mummy, from the original in 1932 to everything that it’s inspired since. But the 2017 version chooses much more poorly with extra cultural references and they often end up contradicting the tone of the movie.

The Mummy wants to be a horror movie in an atmospheric kind of way rather than by showing anything overtly horrific or grotesque but it also wants to be an Indiana Jones movie, which, of course, balanced its joyful qualities with more graphic imagery. It’s overwhelming visual similarities to the Uncharted series of video games (which were, themselves, already heavily inspired by The Mummy movies) also feels like an aesthetically-confused choice.

Response: Sure….I suppose

  1. It Brings Horror To a Non-Horror Audience

Not everyone watches movies in the same way and people don’t always have the same access to movies. The Mummy goes for as wide an audience as it can because it wants to reach the most amount of people and make the most amount of money, yes, but it actually succeeds in bringing classical horror aspects to audiences who ordinarily wouldn’t get to see them.

Aside from Cruise’s name bringing his own kind of audience, The Mummy was a financial hit in China, a country famous for its stringent censorship laws surrounding, amongst several other things, the horror genre and the supernatural.

Response: If you want horror elements but not a horror movie, go watch Pan’s Labrinth.

  1. It Puts the Cart Before the Horse

So much of what makes people remember the 2017 version of The Mummy as a bad movie is that it set itself such an unnecessarily high bar for success.

Audiences were definitely holding it up to, at least, the first two Stephen Sommers Mummy movies but the gigantic budget and shared universe were both its own choice yet both feel wasted. They transform it into something that audiences actively root against rather than for.

Response: Were they trying to give this movie a chance? The response says it all regarding the film successs.

  1. A Pervading Sense of Humor

Stories of production troubles on The Mummy are easy to believe but, no matter how things really went down, what the cast and crew were able to pull out of the movie is a light tone and some comedic chemistry from its actors.

Cruise is a big star with a knack for making sure his movies are driven by him but not all about him. He creates entertaining dynamics with a wide variety of talented actors that he’s paired with and allows what’s best about them to really shine in the movie, even if it isn’t for every long.

Response: Tom Cruise added nothing to this movie, nor did the humor.

Conclusion

After tentatively rewatching the (2017) “The Mummy” I realized the movie is empty. The characters have no volume, the anti-protagonist is wildly underutilized, comedic conversations are out of place, and the tone of the movie is too dark (the color of the film). The movie is not fun, and it comes off more as a chore for the audience to get through. Ultimately, I was surprised at a few points throughout the movie and bored at the same time.

Likes Don’t Define You

I have never been a big social media poster. I’m the person that will scroll through and like other people’s posts, but I rarely post myself. I haven’t really thought much about why I don’t. I’m not sure if it’s because my mom posts often on Facebook (for a couple of years straight she bought a “Facebook Book” that was a photo album of all your posts for the year, so she documented everything she/we did) or because my brother got rid of most social media  (kept Twitter) and never posts. I have just never been one to post on social media, although at times I would like to. I recently started to think more about why I don’t post even when I want to. I don’t really want to commit to saying that I get “social media anxiety” but that could be part of it. We’ve all heard that social media can affect your mental health. It can cause FOMO (Fear of Missing Out), you may feel inadequate in your own life, and it can even cause you to feel more alone. 

For me, I worry about how many likes I get. For example, if I don’t get a certain amount of likes, it means people don’t like me. When it comes to friends and family, I know that that is not true. I have amazing loving and supportive friends and family, so why do I worry about how many likes I get on a post? Shouldn’t social media be for you and not cause you to worry about it? I think it should, but that is not the case for many people. 

I recently heard on a podcast I like that the host, Alex Cooper, is turning off her likes and comments on Instagram. She’s doing it mainly for all the hate comments she gets sent, but also says that she’s doing it for herself. She got caught photoshopping a photo and was aggressively called out for it. There were multiple viral TikTok’s addressing the photoshopping. She also got messages on Instagram from people saying they hate her for photoshopping and telling her to kill herself. 

Hearing about the ability to turn off likes got me interested and thinking more about it. If I turned off the likes I get on my post, would that make me feel more confident in posting?

When you turn off your “likes” on a post, you can still see who’s liked the post, but others can’t see. On Instagram, it will say “Liked by @username and others” so other people won’t be able to see how many people liked the post, but you still will know. But will turning off your likes big be as big of a benefit as some people think?

Sophia Choukas-Bradley, an assistant professor of psychological and brain sciences, says that this may be a step in the right direction, but they do not believe that will be a majorly transformative change. Jeff Hancock, founding director of the Stanford Social Media Lab, also agrees. “Do I think it’s going to have a huge impact on mental health? I don’t think so”. Not many professionals think that this is going to be a huge drastic change to people’s mental health when they use social media. They all say that it is a step in the right direction. That there are some problems to work out with getting rid of the likes feature, such as being able to apply it to all posts and not individual posts. 

I believe that this is a step in the right direction and a good one for Facebook and Instagram. For me being able to apply that feature will ease my mind more of thinking people will judge me for knowing my post didn’t get thousands of likes.

How has the Information Age changed the way we live?

Quinton Miller, Metropolitan State University, April 20th, 2021 Post #5 type #1 (Annotated link & describe what’s present & how it relates to us)

The information age is the time in which we live now. It begun in the late 20th century and is defined by the shift from industrialization to more of an information technology economy. The industrial age brought on new advancements for the Western world creating America’s billionaires who led the nation to become rapidly sustainable. The industrial age brought on new jobs, economic opportunities and an increase in efficiency with the addition of technology. This computerization of material saves companies money in the long run. Humans are not completely counted out as opportunities to repair or maintain the new equipment become available. Also referred to as the digital revolution, new entertainment social and analytical media sprout from it. Entertainment includes internet, video, music and game streaming. These services provide quick downloads, fresh music options, and new digital games. All these industries have flourished from the integration of technology into today’s society.

A major platform is social media. Social media uses the internet to connect users on websites and applications. This platform can be helpful for businesses as well as individuals. For business it helps share ideas and network more easily. Individuals can also Network as well as stay connected with family members, form groups based on shared interest, advocate for a cause the individual is passionate about or to share content quickly and efficiently. Although social media is mostly used on handheld devices, this product started on computers. Social media, like other forms of media, provide information on a business’s reach to their audience. This, in turn, influences marketing strategy and advertising preferences. All of this is wonderful, but how does it relate to the topic of my essay? I’m glad you asked. with the amount of real-time information floating through the internet, there is bound to be unpopular, inaccurate, and misleading information on the internet social media giants’ platforms. Questions like how we combat this or mitigate its effect are commonly assessed due to false information. Some people suggest staying away from social media all together, others want to treat these platforms like class by checking everyone’s work for accuracy or offence. Some people simply do not care. For those who do, stick around to the end of this article for some great resources to gain back your confidence while surfing the web and using social media.

There are resources that elaborate on the ethics of technological advancements and how it has affected the daily lives of those in society. The explanation through the acronym P.A.P.A provides the grounds of how the swiftness in which information travels has impacted those who do and do not use it. The ‘P‘ stands for privacy, the most negatively impacted aspect of life is said to relate to people’s ability to be true to themselves without revealing too much of themselves. ‘A‘ is the accuracy of the information that has traveled, which had been made popular by Donald Trump’s ‘Fake News‘ slogan. The second ‘P’ stands for property. For example, who is entitled to certain information amy come into question when a journalists reveals a secret of a celebrity that tarnishes their image. This even has a lawsuit called ‘Slandering’.

According a to findlaw.com publication, Maddy Teka, a law degree holder from Ethiopia, explains what is entailed in slander cases:

“Someone made a false, defamatory statement about you knowing it was a false statement

The statement does not fall in any privileged category

The person who published it acted negligently when they published the statement

You were harmed by the statement”

(Teka)

https://www.findlaw.com/company/our-team.html

Finally, the second ‘A’ stands for accessibility or who is entitled to certain information. The government is an excellent example of an entity that is supposed to allow information to be accessible, but withholds certain pieces as classified.

Check this instagram post out on tips and tricks to stop web tracking for Ads on Instagram.
This mobile and computer web browser are used by myself and I figured why not share the sugar. This isn’t even a paid ad! DuckDuckGo is just t that good!

Mason, Richard O. “Four Ethical Issues of the Information Age.” MIS Quarterly, vol. 10, no. 1, 1986, pp. 5–12. JSTOR, http://www.jstor.org/stable/248873. Accessed Apr. 2021.

https://www.jstor.org/stable/248873?seq=1

https://www.findlaw.com/injury/torts-and-personal-injuries/how-to-sue-for-slander.html#:~:text=In%20a%20slander%20lawsuit%2C%20you,when%20they%20published%20the%20statement

Virtual influencers: replacing humans with technology

Final Fantasy is one of the biggest franchises in video game history with over 30 games to its name as well as movies, comics, and other merchandise. It was always staple in my household growing up as I would watch my older brothers play what was an interactive movie for hours on end. While it was and still is a titan in the gaming industry, it’s not as commonly known among those who don’t dabble in a video game or two. Color me surprised when in 2015 the protagonist of Final Fantasy 13, Lightning, was announced to be an official model for Louis Vuitton. No matter how much I love Final Fantasy, I had to laugh. She wasn’t even real, how viable is that in the business industry?

Fast forward to 2021 – virtual models and influencers has completely taken off. And they’re successful to boot.

Miquela Sousa – better known as Lil Miquela – is a virtual influencer/model created by company Burd. While the company doesn’t like to formally address her as an influencer, she does bring in quite a sum of money from paid partnerships. As of this post, Lil Miquela has over 3 million followers on Instagram and 2.7 million followers on TikTok. She has modeled for brands like Calvin Klein and Samsung and made almost $12 million in just 2020.

ModelingCafe Inc., a company specializing in CG modeling based in Tokyo, initially created character Imma for fun. Imma is astoundingly realistic, which thrust her immediately into the spotlight and soon into the modeling and influencer business. Imma has around 300k followers on Instagram and recently partnered with Amazon Fashion to launch her own clothing line. Her success has led to the company creating other virtual influencers, such as Imma’s brother Zinn and fellow model Ria.

What’s even more surprising is that both Miquela and Imma haven’t been in the business very long – at most a few years. Yet they’ve already amassed success that would take a real human being quite some time to build.

But what’s the appeal?

Here’s the thing with virtual models – they’re not real. Which means they’re not affected by the things that real human beings are affected by. They can’t get sick with COVID and call in sick to work – they can be on site from anywhere in the world. You don’t have to worry about whether or not the modeled clothes fit their frame – the CG modelers will make it suit their body shape no matter what. Blemishes and the occasional stray strand of hair aren’t a concern. Virtual models are truly the idealistic model for a business – they exist to be positioned and managed.

Well they lose that human appeal, right? Personality is what draws people to influencers – fans only stay because of loyalty.

Actually, virtual influencers have got that covered too.

Lil Miquela’s profile on Instagram reads: “#BlackLivesMatter Change-seeking robot with the drip” followed by a link to her TikTok account. Imma and her brother Zinn’s profiles reads “I’m a virtual girl. I’m interested in Japanese culture, film, and art” and “virtual human. In the fake plastic earth.” followed with links to the company that created them listed as “management.” All of these descriptions paint pictures of different personalities.

Virtual influencers have a human team behind them that creates their personality and interests. Their posts are specifically curated to showcase this crafted personality to be more relatable to the audience. Lil Miquela’s party girl nature is completely different than Imma’s relatable posts lamenting about whether she should block her brother on social media. Even Zinn’s posts occasionally feature pictures that aren’t even him but screenshots from TV shows he watches and recordings of concerts that he (pretend) went to . Virtual influencers aren’t limited to their modeling – they’re carefully managed from the ground up. From what movies they would recommend to growing body hair, virtual influencers mirror a human to a tee.

The biggest factor surrounding the rise of virtual influencers is that they aren’t limited to one skillset. A company can take or make any character and apply any skills needed to promote them.

League of Legends, a competitive online game created by Riot Games, takes a completely different route from the previously named virtual influencers. The game itself is based in combat with a diverse cast of characters related to the basic setting through scattered lore. Using playable characters from the game, they promoted K/DA as a virtual pop group and released the single POP/STARS in 2018. Real musicians provided vocals for the characters and the song has gained 400 million views on YouTube. In a unique promotional campaign, they also created character Seraphine and promoted her on social media. Her Instagram showcases that she is an indie music producer, who even releases songs on SoundCloud. In 2020, they released a collaboration between K/DA and Seraphine while also confirming Seraphine as a new playable character. K/DA’s second single, MORE, has around 77 million views.

There is no doubt that virtual influencers are ideal for business. They are perfectly framed in whatever light the company desires without the hassle of paying them, worrying about scheduling, and other human concerns. While this is an amazing step in technology, there is something dreary about it as well. What does this mean for the future? Will virtual models replace human models? Do virtual models have rights that need to be protected? What are the ethical dilemmas here?

I’m both fascinated and puzzled by what this means for the industry.

Ethics of Online Research Using Publicly Posted Opinions

Quinton Miller, Public Relations Major, MDST 485, January 29th, 2021

Ethics are the moral principles that dictate a persons possible courses of action in given situations. This academic journal goes into depth on the belief that social media is or isn’t effective for collecting health research data. Relevancy to us is is captured by the means to how that data is collected in relation to a change that has happened in technology since this was written. The article explains that some individuals wonder if the data collected affects the people who posted it. Paraphrasing peoples words instead of copying still provides the same amount of insight. Gonzalez-Hernandez argues that the anonymity of sites such as Reddit allows for full reproduction of statements even when the wording is not changed. This could pose as an alternative source to peoples social network postings like Twitter, Facebook and Instagram as the identities are further concealed in anonymous posts. As an additional personal input, I would argue that publicly made posts are already made to be seen as well as share opinions that can be used as research information on the web. Therefore, finding a conglomerate of unnamed opinions for researching purposes isn’t a terrible idea. Especially when social media sites, companies and developers actively listen for key phrases as is.

What I had absorbed is that the way things are done determine their clearance. This could help marketers in the way they present the data collected for commercial and legal purposes. This passage suggests that asking for opinions via surveys makes the research more clinical which requires consent. If the information is expressed publicly it illuminates the issue of meeting a full review by the National Institute of Health. For example, this entity, The National Institute of Health, wouldn’t allow research information related to medical marijuana to surface for credibility if it goes through them because the study of the drug is illegal in designated states, thus negatively pressuring it’s expansion and help to the nation. If anonymous opinions are recorded this study would be allowed to be utilized.

This is only one way to gather information as technology is ever changing and evolving. Bio-technology is predicted to become a more widely used assessment of specific individuals health structure in the near future. Biotech has been used by ancestry.com, myheritage.com and others to determine the ethnic make up of its paying users. I, myself, am awaiting my assessment. This technology will now be used more widely as it becomes more affordable and accurate than doctor diagnosis. Physicians, as qualified as they may be, sometimes inaccurately diagnose patients. This leads to more cost and less effectiveness. This redundancy can be avoided by using a biotech analysis of inherited health concerns and personalize a template for all age ranges of users.

Overall, what’s expressed in the reading is that the way things are done, determines its clearance. This could help marketers in the way they present the data they’ve collected for promotional and legal purposes. An example being, the passage suggesting that asking for opinions via surveys makes the research more clinical which requires consent. If information is expressed publicly, it leads the issue of needing a full review by the NIH.

Gonzalez-Hernandez, G. (2019) On The Ethics of Using Social Media for Health Research https://nlmdirector-nlm-nih-gov.mtrproxy.mnpals.net/2019/06/25/on-the-ethics-of-using-social-media-data-for-health-research/comment-page-1/

Biotechnology Innovation Organization https://archive.bio.org/articles/diagnostics

Bridging the Gap Between Social Media and Advertisement by Accessing How Audiences Are Targeted

Quinton Miller, MDST 485 Communicating with New Media, Public Relations Major, Metropolitan State University

January 22nd, 2021

This scholarly journal keys in on the increasing popularity of CBD products. Through algorithms set for identifying certain words, this passage explains the analysis taking place surrounding the conversation concerning attitudes towards cannabinoid (CBD) and its purpose. Terms including anxiety, stress or nausea were identified as indicators for therapeutic necessities. This could help with uncovering what language companies who sell these types of products would use in their advertisements going forward. It may also provide insight into a drug policy that needs revision for places that do not allow it due to the products legality based on those first hand accounts documented from forums. This includes Cannabinol/CBD, hemp oil and Cannabis. There are pieces of qualitative data from these findings which is what some new age advertising services utilize. Not only does this tie into the cannabis sector of public relations in new media through explanation of a methodology professionals can use on social media platforms, this academic journal is relevant to us as citizens. When using social media, we often find advertisements geared towards something we’ve recently posted, viewed or talked about. The algorithm, similar to a control F function in a word document, gives an example of how our data is utilized in studies. Once we, as users of these platforms, think outside the box and consider other ways our words are used, we can conduct other research as to how social media and advertisements have played hand-in-hand.

Does this remind us of anyone who whistle blew about this in the past?

This news article was originally written in the beginning of 2018 and revised in October of 2020. This article includes a video experiment of a couple conversing about cat food to see if ads would begin to appear in relation to their conversation. They concluded that facebook had been listening for keywords in their conversations due to the fact that cat food advertisements begun appearing days later. These readings seem distant on the surface, but with a little critical analysis in the mindset of media communication, people can bridge the gap between an obvious new age of targeting methods and terminology. Both articles involve keywords instead of age groups. All users of either the forum or social media who used certain words were taken into account. Each of these had different ways and different purposes, but they could relate to the ways companies use new media to gather and target data on potential consumers.

Take a look below and try it out for yourself !

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U0SOxb_Lfps

Of course this isn’t the real Edward Snowden’s instagram. (I doubt we’ll see the real Snowden on social media). This is a instagram fanpage dedicated to the man who informed the world of what the NSA had been doing.

Narcity Media, October 2020, Why You Keep Getting Ads For Things You’ve Talked About But Haven’t Searched Up Online https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.narcity.com/amp/why-you-keep-getting-ads-for-things-youve-talked-about-but-havent-searched-up-online

International Journal of Drug Policy Vol. 77, Mar 2020, Social Media Surveillance for Perceived Therapeutic Effects of Cannabinol (CBD) Products https://www-sciencedirect-com.mtrproxy.mnpals.net/science/article/pii/S0955395920300293

Hey! (Introductory Post)

Hey everyone, My name is Quinton. This is extremely new for me. I’ve never heard of or used WordPress. If I had ran across it before I don’t remember. I’m always up for new challenges. Its a plus that this allows for website creation because I want to use something like this in the future for personal reasons. I’d originally only known about Wix.com. Interesting!

Influencer Woos

Link: https://www.abbienaija.com/2018/12/being-influencer-is-not-real-job.html

The point of working is to make money and be successful as long as it is legitimate. Right?

Abimbola is a Social Media Influencer and Fashion Blogger. She states that being an ‘Influencer’ is a real job that comes with tasks, deadlines, campaign direction(s), pivots, research and overall hard work. Just like any job, there’s competition and the need to stand out and be among the top influencers a brand or company chooses to work with (whether for a one-off project or an ongoing campaign). She hints that being an Influencer might even be a little risky because of the inconsistency in payments – “Oh, did I mention how you have to wait 30 days or even two months before you get paid?

She does state that there are influencers out there who are fake and only care about the money; who don’t actually trust or believe in the product(s) they’re recommending/promoting to their audience base.

Overall, am I impressed?
Yes, actually. From someone who’s been interning at a PR agency for the last 11 months, I’d say Abimbola is very knowledgeable (I’m sure) in what a partnership looks like for her and what it could look like for the brand/agency she’s working with. And it looks like she’s already made headway in paid sponsored content (see screen grabs above) and living her best “Instagram” life.

Is there more to uncover, beyond her blog?
Oh yeah. I’m sure she meant every word on her post – but I do feel like she’s approaching it from an “I’m a starving artist” standpoint. In addition, YES – from an agency POV, an entire marketing/PR campaign works when you are pitching the media, running social, managing paid ads, etc. however, what they don’t tell you is that these campaigns have been in the planning stages for months maybe even years. In these cases, how effective and necessary are influencers? And most importantly, brands want to know how reliable these Influencers are.

There are a lot of gray areas when agreeing to these kinds of partnerships. More often than not, brands know what they want and can give more content direction, but sometimes it could flop if you let an influencer get too creative. For example, Tiffany Mitchell (@tifforelie), an Influencer with over 200k+ followers on Insta posted a photo of her mid-accident after crashing her motorcycle. In her lengthy post about the accident, there’s an image that clearly shows a bottle of Smartwater. Because her post came off as staged, she received a ton of backlash. (Yikes)

Brands shouldn’t have to rely on Influencers.
I believe that if a brand’s story, mission or vision is top of mind for everyone at their company (meaning all employees practice and demonstrates the company’s core values) then there would be no need for Influencers whatsoever – I strongly believe that the greatest assets a company or brand has are its people: the employees, their families, their corporate responsibility partnerships, etc. A brand should want to rely on these folks to be their number one advocator and not someone they randomly found through an Insta hashtag.

M

I’m a Fraud.

Okay, I’m not. But I do often ask myself the following questions: Am I really good at what I do? Do I actually have solid experience to be giving you a reco (aka recommendation) and my POV? Am I just lucky? Do I deserve to be here?

Some days, I’m a natural hustler – I can tackle my day-to-day tasks and leave feeling very accomplished. Other days, I get too hard on myself if I mess up or don’t get something right. I crawl into a tiny ball inside my head and feel unnecessarily small, telling myself I’m not fit to be doing the work that I do.

There’s a word for that. It’s called the Imposter Syndrome. And here’s how I’ve learned to beat it on the not-so-good days.

Graphic created via Canva

So if you’ve managed to skip over the definition of Imposter Syndrome, in brief, it can be described as “…a feeling of phoniness and unworthiness among people when it comes to their achievements. And even though they’re highly motivated, they don’t really believe any of the credit that comes their way.” (Lou Solomon, TEDx)

“We feel like we have snuck in the back door of life’s theater and made our way up on stage and there’s a big bouncer out there and we know that if he sees us, we’re outta here so we’re constantly looking over our shoulder.”

Lou Solomon, TEDx Charlotte: The Surprising Solution to the Imposter Syndrome

1. Use social for self-good.

Affirmations are really energy boosters. Sometimes when I’m in a rut and I can’t seem to get out of my thoughts, I need emotional support. And it’s completely okay to need it and want it. This usually comes in the form of a social media post on Facebook where I ask friends and family to send me words of encouragement; this can either be in the comment section or a personal message. It’s not because I’m self-absorbed or needy (fortunately, I’ve overcome this thought), it’s because I’ve gathered the courage to ask of and for others so that I can continue showing up and being the best version I can be.

“The things you can do to sustain strength in your life is to live, fail, love and ask for help.” 

Lou Solomon, TEDx Charlotte: The Surprising Solution to the Imposter Syndrome

2. Go out and see people.

Usually on my bad days, all I want to do is shut the blinds, hop into bed and watch Korean dramas – consciously forgetting that I have a million other to-dos. I do this because it’s easier. I’m still working on keeping myself accountable, but as described, I can’t some days. So I make sure I get others to keep me accountable; this usually means setting up dates with friends! Coffees, dinners, brunches, you name it. Getting up, dressing up and eating out seems to do the trick. It’s refreshing to talk about other topics of interest and catch up with people I love. It’s real medicine and I forget that my mind and soul needs it from time to time. And maybe yours does too.

3. Create.

There’s something so peaceful about letting your creativity just flow. No pre-conceived notions, no creative briefs, no goals or strategies. I’ve just recently started this creative journey with 100 Days of Drawing – instead of strictly going a hundred days, I’ve taken it slow, skipped a few pages and drawn whatever I felt like drawing. That’s the beauty of creating; there are no expectations and no limits. Drawing, manifesting, creating – it all leads to self-discovery. However, I’m not a regular doodler and I don’t draw on the daily (as mentioned). I save drawing for when I most need it. When the days are exhausting, my thoughts too heavy and my social a little too saturated, it’s only then that I draw. It’s the “me now” investing in much-needed space and time for the “future me.”

4. Find your radical hero.

With every villain, there’s a radical hero. In her TED talk, Lou describes this radical hero being wiser and not willing to buy into your negative thoughts; someone who has a deeper point of view and is essentially your own personal cheerleader. When you start to doubt yourself and your self worth, summon your radical hero to call out the lies and the limiting beliefs that could isolate you and allow yourself to listen for brilliance. Once you’re able to, you’ll start to see some clarity and feel a lot better knowing that you’re more than qualified. You’re right where you’re supposed to be.

5. Reflect.

I’m no where near where I want to be in terms of mental and emotional wealth, but I’m getting there. Slowly but surely. And it all comes down to reflecting. Reflecting on my way to work, through a podcast, right before bed or even as I’m brushing my teeth. I’m a busy person and I get bursts of reflective moments. It’s odd but it works for me and my lifestyle. So here’s my last request of you in conquering this epidemic, always pursue a sense of wholeness over perfection. Taking time to reflect on your highs and lows, the work you want to do and your purpose in life will allow you to see things in a different light and set you up for success. And even that might look a little different and that’s okay.

Cheers,

M

Intrigued? Learn more about Imposter Syndrome HERE.

Positive Versus Negative Effects of Social Media on Children and Adolescents

Social media has now been around long enough for us to see the effects it can have on not only us, but our children. Are those effects positive? Are they negative? Let’s discuss the two opposing views.

Five aspects of social media use:

  1. Few restrictions on expression
  2. Easily share information
  3. Support one another (“Likes”)
  4. Various forms of expression
  5. Socialize in an alternative setting

Positive Effects

According to Angela Barnes and Christine Laird from an article about the effects of social media on children, there are many ways that social media can be used in both positive and negative ways. Regarding the positive aspects, Barnes and Laird state that social media opens the doors for creativity, interactive learning, and the ability to connect with others who share common interests. They continue this idea by stating that social networking can help students connect, as face-to-face interaction may seem more daunting at a younger age.

Negative Effects

On the opposing side, Barnes and Laird state that social media may also have negative effects on children and adolescence. The first negative effect that is mentioned is its impact on mental health. They state that “the level of effect, according to research, seems to go up as teens’ use goes up. Their level of contentment can decrease, and their likelihood of getting into trouble or being depressed can increase” (Rideout, 2010). Another concerning aspect mentioned is the issue of cyberbullying. With many different forms of social media, come many different ways young adults are allowed to oppress and intimidate those who are perceived as more vulnerable. The difference between bullying and cyberbullying is the fact that children, adolescents and even adults are the victims of not only negative comments from peers face-to-face, but from a whole network of complete strangers online.

The use of social media is a powerful thing. We have found that it holds both positive and negative effects, so the most important thing you can do is to pay attention to your child’s level of usage and keep open communication about what they experience online.