Tag Archives: College

Un-Mankind?

A student at Northern Arizona University lost a point for using mankind in his essay.
While I completely agree that we should never encourage sexism or racism, boycotting words such as ‘mankind’ and ‘man-made’ and punishing college students who use such words in their essays by taking points off their grades is ridiculous and is taking away time and attention from other pressing issues. As a woman who is an advocate for women’s rights and encourages equality for everyone, I just feel like this is too much and distasteful. This is taking gendered language too far. At the time when this word was invented it was probably geared towards a gender-neutral meaning. As a college student we all understand the importance of every point in our assignments, quizzes, and tests. Imagine getting docked for a word, even if that word has MAN in it; instead of “human” or “people”
We cannot expect all students to completely change things they’re used to all of a sudden.  Even if such words are to be banned forever, students need time to get used to the change. “Docking points” is unacceptable.  Sorry Northern Arizona University, that’s not the right way to correct “sexist” language.

Savings on a College Budget?

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I’m totally going to rant out for a moment about a blog post I read on how to save money.

First off let me warn you, I’m paying my way through college, while working a fulltime job that barely makes ends meet. So I’m sure you can imagine it’s difficult for me to look at saving money the same way as someone who can live off of 51 percent of their income. Currently a growing savings account to me is a fanciful land where fairies and dragons roam lush forests filled with rainbow waterfalls, Reality is… However, I still thought I should read the blog post and see what I could learn about saving some extra money. Here’s a snapshot from the blog: “Throughout the year, I lived on an average of 51 percent my income ($28,000), saved 31 percent ($17,000), and spent the other 18 percent on travel ($10,000). I proved that I could live on less, save more, and do more of what I loved, and learned so many other lessons throughout the process.” The author goes on to share some suggestions like cutting out spending money on nonessentials such as her $100 plus a month habit of buying coffee. Are you kidding me? That’s when I realized my monthly savings is the equivalent to someone’s bad coffee problem and I couldn’t relate to what I was reading. The author leaves out the possibility that her audience might not have the same financial means as she does. The post would have been more effective had she considered a wider audience. I, like the author of the post I disagree with are biased. Having your own perspective is an inevitable aspect of online communities and it’s not a bad thing, we just have to recognize this factor.

Link to post:

https://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/i-lived-on-51-of-my-income-saved-17000_us_5a60f7bce4b0e07b3731ceea

 

 

 

The Lack of Sleep During Your College Years

If you stop and ask a college student if they’ve ever pulled an “all-nighter” to study for a test, or to write that last minute paper the response is likely, “Yes”. I know during the years I’ve been in school I’ve sacrificed a lot of sleep due to my procrastination and poor study habits.  The relationship college students have with sleep is something that needs to be improved in the years to come. According to Shelley Hershner and Ronald Chervin 50% of all college students report daytime sleepiness and 70% report they attain insufficient sleep. Those numbers are quite high, but not shocking to most. The lack of sleep for college students attribute to lower grade point averages, higher rates of car accidents, and possible failure of college classes.  Not only do GPAs and academic success hinge on the amount of sleep a college student gets, but the lack of sleep also attributes to altered, negative moods.

One reason college students attain insufficient sleep is simply because there is so much going on around college campuses. Both academically and socially, students can be overwhelmed with the prioritization of their needs.  Living in a college dorm is a blessing and a curse. Each pair of roommates have a different schedule and a different set of priorities. As the years go on, it seems as though self-care and wellness seem to go by the wayside. To fix this problem, the path is a two-way street. Universities need to adjust policies and engage in campus outreach to spread the message that sleep is exceptionally important to a student’s academic success. Also, students need to realize how much of their success hinges on getting the appropriate amount of sleep.

 

Read further:
Sleep Study

Is Sleep Deprivation The New Norm?

Time to Sleep

When was the last time you woke up feeling refreshed and well rested since becoming a college student? It’s not typical when we have many classes, assignment deadlines, group projects, and class discussions that we try to cram at 11:59 pm. No one said that college was going to be easy, but who thought it was going to be this difficult getting eight hours of good sleep at night—I’m lucky if I get six!

One thing we constantly sacrifice as students is our SLEEP. There are so many negative effects of not getting enough sleep though, and it has to change… like right now. According to the University Health Center of Georgia,“On average, most college students get 6 – 6.9 hours of sleep per night, and the college years are notoriously sleep-deprived due to an overload of activities.”  It goes on to say, “Recent research on college students and sleep indicates that insufficient sleep impacts our health, our moods, our GPA and our safety.”
Sleep is crucial for everyone. Although we are constantly dodging it for more ‘significant’ priorities like catching up with friends to unwind from our drowning week of assignments, exams, and just a workload of never-ending deadlines, we need to start jotting down in our calendars to try get at least 8 hours of sleep every night. That way, we live a more productive and healthier life. After all, as Dr.  Knepler says, “Half the reason you’re at college really is to learn and not getting enough sleep can keep college students from their goals of succeeding in school.”
So, let’s get some great night time sleep and pass our classes well-rested.
If you want to get more tips and advice on how you can get more sleep at night, the articles below have some wonderful pointers.

Staying Healthy in School

It’s that time of year where everybody is hacking and sneezing all over the place. If you aren’t sick, the person sitting next to you in your Media Studies class probably is. The best way to deal with the sickness is to avoid it altogether. Here are a few tips for keeping yourself healthy while on your grind.

-Antibacterial wipes

Our cellphones are great for keeping us connected at all times, but they’re also breeding ground for the germs that will make us sick. Check out this article from CBS regarding how much…stuff…is on your phone.

https://www.cbsnews.com/news/the-best-way-to-clean-your-grimy-bacteria-laden-cellphone/

The best way to prevent flu-causing bacteria from being transferred to other surfaces, including yourself, is to clean your phone. Bye, bye, germs!

-Drink lots of water

Yes, even if you hate the taste of it. Water is necessary for the body to function properly. It keeps everything moist and doing what it’s supposed to do. Here’s an article about how water can prevent you from getting the flu. http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-203142/Why-water-ward-flu.html

There are lots of simple ways to stay healthy this time of year, and these are just a few examples. Take the time to keep yourself healthy!

Your Mental Health, You Should Care

Being a college student is stressful in itself due to deadlines, major projects, and weekly assignments. Many students work a full time job while juggling multiple courses and some students have families too that they need to take care of. Personally, I have had a terrible past year for my mental health due to a stressful job and major life events but I have recently been working on bettering my mental health by leaving that stressful job and starting a new one that is a lot less stressful with a lot of fulfillment throughout my day.

When trying to understand how to improve my mental health, I stumbled upon a study from the University of Michigan (www.uhs.umich.edu) that provides 10 ways to better your mental health and they include sub points as well. Such as, take care of your body by drinking more water, get enough sleep, or eat nutritious meals. There are so many important aspects to improving your mental health and even the littlest of steps can make a huge difference.

As a college student, I often stay up late working on homework or writing papers and then I work early in the morning so my sleep schedule gets ruined during each semester. Sleep is a very important factor in maintaining a adequate mental health routine. There are a lot of other factors associated with not getting enough sleep which are laid out in www.livingly.com

I wish you all the best of luck with improving your mental health because there is always room for improvement especially during the semester. I wish you all the best of luck and hopefully these links come in handy.

Need Help Studying?

Do you find yourself stressing when it comes to tests? Feel overly anxious when you try to sit down and study? With the help of topuniversities.com and oxfordlearning.com you can overcome your fear, and be better prepared for test day!

One of the most important concepts is to give yourself enough time to study. It’s better to study 1 hour every day for 5 days, then to study for 5 hours 1 day. By studying the same content repeatedly, your brain has an easier time remembering it.

Another key tip is to organize your work space and steer clear of distractions. By focusing solely on studying, you will be more apt to remember what you are studying, and do it in less time! If you stay off YouTube for 2 hours and study, you can go on YouTube all you want after.

Another big tip is to study using old test, if this is possible. This will allow you to see questions that are similar in nature, so you can get a food feel for what the test will look like. This way there’ll be less surprises come test day.

Organizing a study group is another great idea. By working together with your fellow peers, you will be able to better understand the material. You will create a vivid memory of the things you studied and will be better able to recall the information you learned at the time. Also, helping and teaching others will solidify the information in your brain, making it easier to recall that information for a test.

The final tip is to take regular breaks and to snack on brain food. By taking regular breaks, you allow yourself to fully process and store the new information you have just learned. By snacking on brain food, you are refueling your tired brain after it’s been working so hard trying to remember all those vocab terms!

For the full list of tips, check out the links, and good luck on your next exams!

Taking Charge of YOUR Education!

As Students of Metropolitan State University, we share a common interest in our educational goals. MnSCU (Minnesota State Colleges & Universities) is the State organization which assesses and allocates funds to each Minnesota college and university. They also oversee the policy and operations of the public four-year and two-year higher education institutions in Minnesota.

Screen Shot 2016-04-30 at 7.46.53 AMThe good news is that as students we have advocates working on our behalf to encourage policy makers – at both the state and federal level – to improve legislation and funds allocations to benefit students and lower the costs of attendance and associated living expenses. This advocacy influences the operations of MnSCU; therefore, each individual institution of higher learning; and subsequently you!

Students attending one of the twenty-four public two-year colleges in Minnesota are represented by MSCSA – the Minnesota State College Student Association.

At the four-year public Universities in Minnesota, students are represented by MSUSA – the Minnesota State University Student Association.

Both of these groups are non-profits who by law are entitled to collect a fee from all students to fund their advocacy work. MSCSA collects $0.35 per credit hour. MSUSA collects $0.43 per credit hour.

These fees are automatically calculated into our costs of attendance paid to the school. Therefore, it is critical that we utilize the resources that we are paying for.

Now, I know as students we typically hate paying for anything additional that we can imagine doing without. These fees are worth every penny! They are directly related to the tuition freeze that we currently have in Minnesota. As an alumnus of MSCSA, I can speak to the hard work and dedicated effort with which numerous students volunteer and the time and dedication the staff apply to train students in leadership and advocacy. I worked first hand as the elected platform representative of the seven colleges in North Western Minnesota to develop a platform for the association which represented the views and needs of that demographic.

Only you can ensure that you are represented well.

Each college and university sends delegates from each institution through their student government organization, to represent their school. Here at Metro State, we are represented by a diverse group of students who should be working to represent you. You have the right to attend the public meetings and speak to your student representatives about the issues that are important to you and your experience as a student at Metro.

I encourage you to do so!

Here is how:
You can contact Metro State’s Student Senate Here.
You can also find out when to attend Student Senate meetings Here.

 

What do you think?
Tell me in the comment section below.